Pvt. Daniel W. Pine

Forgotten But Not For Long


The re-interment of Private, Daniel W. Pine, took place on Saturday, May 12, 2001 at 1:30 P.M. in Hillcrest Memorial Cemetery.

The Cemetery is located at 1425 Elm Road ( 1/4 mile south of I-94 exit No. 141 ) in Jackson, Michigan.


We thank everyone for attending and taking part in this historic event.

Please check back in a few weeks as we plan to
pictorially present the complete story and ceremony.


Items of interest

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Construction of the 1880's casket by Mr. John Adair Monroe, Undertaker, and Horatio Farquahr, Farquahr Enterprises. Click HERE to see their handiwork.

The Nelson - House Funeral Home glass hearse complete with team of horses. Click HERE to see it.

The stone that will be placed at Daniel Pine's grave in the Field of Honor. Click HERE to see it.

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The service for Daniel W. Pine was not a reenactment but an actual burial with all the formality and dignity accorded it. Those in attendance witnessed a service exactly as it would have occured had Private Pine's fellow veterans from the local G.A.R. Post conducted the proceedings.

Since the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Austin Blair Post No. 7, Jackson, Michigan, are the heirs of the Grand Army of the Republic, they conducted this 1880's ceremony according to ritual.

The ceremony used the Burial Ritual as adopted by the National Encampment of the G.A.R. in 1873 and which continued to be used into the 20th century. After the horse drawn hearse brought the remains of Private Pine to the new burial site there was a brief program about Daniel Pine's military service and his life as we know of it after the war and how his abandoned grave was discovered a century later.

Let us never forget that Daniel W. Pine was an ordinary man who volunteered to defend the Union to ensure that we, the living, enjoy the freedoms of our great country and remain to this day "one nation, undivided, with liberty and justice for all."

Below is the story of Daniel Pine.


Buried in an isolated grave for more than 111 years
Private Pine's headstone is seen in the top left quadrant of the picture.

The inscription reads
D. W. PINE
CO. E.
122 N. Y. INF.

In 1889 Private Daniel Pine received a pauper's burial and was lost to history for 111 years in a secluded and overgrown grave in an old Jackson County cemetery. Back then the cemetery was out in the country, only sparsely utilized and partially owned by one of Pine's former employers. There are less than 50 marked graves there, and for reasons not known, Daniel was buried a considerable distance from the others. Over the years this entire cemetery has reverted to a natural state of tangled trees and scrub undergrowth. It was during Camp Austin Blair's on-going graves registration program that, by chance, a worker happened to spot his military headstone from a quarter mile away.

Private Pine volunteered for military duty on August 12, 1862 when he was 36 years old in Onondaga County, New York. He served with the 122nd New York Infantry with the rank of Private throughout the remainder of the Civil War.

His regiment took part in most of the major battles in the east and was mustered out in 1865. He then returned to New York and was hired as a laborer on a spur of the Erie Canal. For unknown reasons he came to Jackson about 1875, where he always lived in rooming houses.

Records show he was single and had no known family residing in Michigan. Characteristic of a great many adults of that day, he was unable to read or write. This limited him to little more than unskilled work.

Daniel Pine was employed by the Jackson Furniture Company for approximately ten years. With advancing years and declining health he applied for a Civil War Veteran's pension when they became available. He cited two Civil War wounds. The first received at Cedar Creek, Virginia, in 1864, the other during the siege of Petersburg, Virginia.

Still with no pension by early 1887, Mr. Pine could no longer work or care for himself and was admitted to the Michigan Soldier's Home in Grand Rapids. Two years later he died while visiting a friend in Jackson on April 8, 1889. With no family in Michigan and no money, he was buried the very next day at county expense as an "indigent veteran." It was three more years before a government headstone was in place to mark his isolated grave.


PRIVATE PINE'S REMAINS WERE MOVED TO A PLACE OF HONOR

Costs for the reburial were shared by Hillcrest Memorial Park, the J. L. Watson Funeral Chapel and Austin Blair Camp No. 7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.

Hillcrest Memorial Park relocated his headstone and re-buried Private Pine in his new casket and vault in their Veteran's "Field of Honor."

Mr. Jerry Watson of the Watson Funeral Chapel and Richard Morris of Hillcrest Memorial Park Staff exhumed the old grave and placed Private Pine's remains in the new casket. Because Daniel Pine was buried in a plain wooden casket with no burial vault, his remains had to be painstakingly removed, much like an archeological dig.


Contributors
We Thank You
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

  • ADCO Employees, Michigan Center, MI.
  • Meijer, E. Mich. Ave., Jackson, MI.
  • Pioneer Foundry, Jackson, MI.
  • Sam's Club, Jackson, MI.
  • Stan Lyon Welding, Parma, MI.
  • The Store, Vandercook Lake, MI.
  • Thompson-McCully Co., Jackson, MI.


ORGANIZATIONS

  • American Legion Auxiliary No. 81, Concord - Pulaski Post, Concord, MI.
  • Ann Arbor Civil War Roundtable, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • Auxiliary to the Austin Blair Camp No. 7, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Jackson, MI.
  • Jackson County Historical Society, Jackson, MI.
  • Military Women of Jackson County Memorial Post No. 1, Jackson, MI.
  • Tent No. 3, Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Detroit, MI.
  • Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary 3692, Albion, MI.
  • 122nd New York State Volunteer Infantry Re-enactors, Syracuse, NY.


INDIVIDUAL

  • J. Babcock, Jackson, MI.
  • Becky Cunningham, Spring Arbor, MI.
  • Bruce Currie, Somerset, MI.
  • John & Mary Delcamp, Ypsilanti, MI.
  • John & Debra Downey, Traverse City, MI.
  • Dan & Cecilia Doyle, Somerset, MI.
  • Dale & Colleen Endicotte, Jackson, MI.
  • Judy Gross, Grass Lake, MI.
  • Tom Hollister, Dundee, MI.
  • Bob & Ruth Jennings, Jackson, MI.
  • Marlene Laing, Jackson, MI.
  • Philip & Katherine Leathead, Parma, MI.
  • John Mann, Lansing, MI.
  • Gary Martin, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • Max & Darlene Miller, Parma, MI.
  • Ellyn Painter, Jackson, MI.
  • David Speer, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • Gary Videto, Spring Arbor, MI.
  • Brenda Walters, Concord, MI.
  • Danny L. Wheeler, Utica, NY.
  • Gary & Pat Woodman, Jackson, MI.
  • Joan B. Yates, Beverly Hills, MI.
  • Russell C. Youngdahl, Jackson, MI.


CONTRIBUTORS OF GOODS & SERVICES

  • Vermeer Sales & Services, Jackson, MI. - Ground Penetrating Radar ( Underground Surveillance ).
  • Nelson - House Funeral Home, Owosso, MI. - Circa 1870's Hearse.
  • Earl Schultz, Concord, MI. - Team of Horses.
  • John Adair Monroe, Midland, MI. - Circa 1800's Casket.
  • Horatio Farquhar, Washtenaw County, MI. - Circa 1800's Casket.
  • John Mann, Lansing, MI. - Design & Production of Printed Material.
  • Boy Scouts of America, Great Saulk Trail Council - Traffic and Parking.
  • New York State Flags, Department of New York, SUVCW.


BEGINNING OF THE PROJECT

Vermeer technician scanning the burial site for remains using ground radar equipment

Examining the scanned data


Last updated on 10-30-09
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