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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


November, 2012


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Treasurer Report
What they said
Soldiers of the War
Arlington National Cemetery
Upcoming events
Back Issues

Commanders Column


Gentlemen, My complements.

So November is upon us once again. Appears also have become a active month for our Camp as well.

3 Nov.: Civil War Roundtable in Lansing.
    Detroit Veterans Day Parade.

10 Nov.: HAPPY BIRTHDAY United States MARINE CORPS. S. F.
    Sesquest. round table in Lansing.
    1812 Remembrance in Monroe.

11 NOV.: VETERANS DAY 11 - 11 - 11.
    Jackson Defense of the Flag.
    Mason MI Parade.

12 Nov.: Camp Meeting.

22 Nov.:Thanksgiving Day and the usual. Hopefully with ones family and loved ones. May we make the most of it Gentlemen. For it seems the good times we experience are all TOO fleeting.

Let us NOT overlook 6 Nov. For Gods Sake VOTE Gentlemen. For our Country needs its PATRIOTS today, just as it has needed them in 1861. And countless times since.

In F. L. C.

Henry Hawker
Camp Commander/PCC/Camp Historian
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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What they Said
What they said of each other


Lincoln

Stanton
"He is the rock on the beach of our national ocean against which the breaker dash and roar, dash and roar without ceasing. I do not see how he survives, why he is not crushed and torn to pieces. Without him I would be destroyed."

Abraham Lincoln on Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton.


Grant

Stanton
"He was an able constitutional lawyer and jurist, but the Constitution was not an impediment to him while the war lasted."

General Ulysses S. Grant on Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton.


McClellan

Stanton
"...The most depraved hypocrite & villain I have had the bad fortune to meet with. If he had lived in the time of the Savior, Judas Iscariot would have remained a respected member of the fraternity of Apostles."

Gen George McClellan on Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton.


Stevens

Johnson
"Glad to hear it. It relieves God Almighty of the responsibility."

Thaddeus Stevens when told that Andrew Johnson was ‘a self made man."


Chandler

McClellan
"...He is a imbecile if not a traitor and if a traitor he ought to be shot."

Michigan Senator Zechariah Chandler on General George McCellan.


Crooker

Halleck
"The process by which the Union army worked its way to Corinth has passed into history as one of the most inefficient operations of the war. It involved an elaboration of strategy that now looks a good deal like imbecility.

Capt Lucien Crooker 55th Illinois letting us know his real feelings about General Henry Hallick movements toward Corinth after the Battle of Shiloh.


McClellan

Hallech
"Of all the men whom I have encountered in high position Halleck was the most hopelessly stupid. It was more difficult to get an idea through his head than can be conceived by any one who never made the attempt. I do not think he ever had a correct military idea from beginning to end."

Gen George McClellan on Gen Henry Halleck.


Lee

Whitting
General Lee was ask by President Davis what he thought of General Whiting who in the past had severely criticized Lee. Without hesitation, Lee commended him in high terms, calling him one of the ablest men in the army. Afterward, a fellow officer took Lee aside and asked him why he had not told Davis the things Whiting had said about him, Lee's reply was, "It was my understanding that the President wanted to know my opinion of Whiting, not Whiting's opinion of me."


Whitman

Wounded
"Love for them lives as long as I draw breath."

Walt Whitman speaking of wounded soldiers.


Union Soldier

Union Officer
"I wish to God one half of our officers were knocked in the head by slinging them against the other half."

Union soldier.


J. Brown

O. Brown
"Shut up and die like a man."

John Brown to his son Oliver when he moaned after being wounded in the Harpers Ferry raid.


Lt Col Lilly
9th IN Cav.

Steamship
Sultana
We're living once more in the hightest of clovers, For the shootin' an' stabbin' an' killin' is over!
The dying is done, my fine feathered friend: The war as come to a glorious end!

Chorus of a song written in a prison stockade and sung by members of the 9th IN Cavalry when loading onto the Sultana.

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~ Soldiers of the War ~

Men in the ranks:

There were 127 Northern soldiers recorded as being age 13; 330 age 14; 773 age 15; 2,758 age 16; 6,425 age 17; 133,475 age 18; 90,215 age 19; 71,058 age 20; 97,136 age 21. From there on it gradually went down to 7,012 age 45; 967 age 46; and 2,366 age 50 or over.

As to physical characteristics, the average height of the Federal soldier was put at 5 feet, 8¼ inches. The tallest man authentically recorded was said to be Capt. Van Buskirk of the Twenty-seventh Indiana, who stood 6 feet, 10½ inches. The shortest man as far as records go was a member of the 192nd Ohio, and at the age of 24 he measured 3 feet, 4 inches in height.

Incomplete records indicate the average weight was 143¼ pounds. About 13 per cent had black hair, 25 per cent dark hair, 30 per cent brown, 24 per cent light, 4 per cent sandy, 3 per cent red, and 1 per cent gray hair. Forty-five per cent of the Yankees had blue eyes, 24 per cent gray, 13 per cent hazel, 10 per cent dark, and 8 per cent black.

In prewar occupations some 48 per cent of the Yankees were farmers, 24 per cent mechanics, 16 per cent laborers, 5 per cent in "commercial pursuits," 3 per cent professional men, and 4 per cent miscellaneous.

As to nativity of Northerners, basing the Army on a total of 2,500,000, about three fourths were native Americans. Of the 500,000 foreign-born, about 175,000 were from Germany, 150,000 from Ireland, 50,000 from England, 50,000 from British America, and 75,000 from other countries.

The vast majority of soldiers on both sides were volunteers. There were 16,367 in the Regular Army in 1861. This increased to 25,463 by January 1, 1863, and then dropped to 21,669 by March 31, 1865. There was a militia (on paper at least) in most states, but as an actual force it had before the war fallen into ineffectual decay and cannot be said to have been more than an institution for occasional parades, festivals, or social events.

In the North the draft act of 1863 resulted in four different enrollments: July, 1863; March, 1864; July, 1864; and December, 1864. These drafts resulted in a total of 249,259 men being held to service. Of this total, some 86,724 paid commutation to be relieved of service, which brought in $26,366,316.78. There were actually 162,535 men raised by the draft. Of this total only 46,347 men were held to personal service; 116,188 furnished substitutes. Thus the draft provided only about 6 per cent of the total Federal enlistments in the Army. Nevertheless the drafts main effect seems to have been to stimulate enlistments of volunteers who made up the great bulk of the manpower.

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On the Southern Side:

Tennessee was the main source for pork and primary food stuffs for the Confederate Army both in the West and the Army of Northern Virginia. And Tennessee sent men to the Confederate Army both in the East & Western Armies:

Virginia: 175,000
Florida: 15,000
Georgia: 120,000
North Carolina: 129,000
South Carolina: 75,000
Mississippi: 70,000
Alabama: 90,000
Tennessee: 115,000

Because of the destruction of any central repository of records in Richmond in 1865 and the comparatively poor record-keeping of the time, there can be no definitive number that represents the strength of the Confederate States Army. Estimates range from 500,000 to 2,000,000 men who were involved at any time during the war. Reports from the War Department began at the end of 1861 (326,768 men), 1862 (449,439), 1863 (464,646), 1864 (400,787), and "last reports" (358,692). Estimates of enlistments throughout the war were 1,227,890 to 1,406,180.

The assaulting column of Confederate soldiers at Gettysburg during Pickets Charge consisted of 41 regiments and one battalion, excepting the supporting brigade of Wilcox, Lang, Thomas, and Perrin, who did not reach Cemetery Ridge. Nineteen of the regiments were from Virginia, 15 from North Carolina, three each from Tennessee and Mississippi, and one regiment and one battalion were from Alabama.

On the afternoon of November 30, 1864 at Franklin, Tennessee, the Confederates charged into the Union defenses, after covering almost 2 miles of open land. The Rebel lines moved forward in nearly perfect unison, the last great charge of the war. Parts of the Union's outer trenches fell to Hood's men, but a Yankee counterattack spelled disaster for the Confederates. They did not penetrate any further and suffered significant casualties.

The fighting continued until after dark before Schofield resumed his march northward. Of 15,000 Union troops engaged, some 200 were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded. The Confederates had 23,000 men at Franklin; approximately 1,750 died and 5,500 were wounded or captured. The losses among the Confederate leadership were major. Six generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, one of the Confederate army's finest division commanders. Another five were wounded, one more captured, and 60 of Hood's 100 regimental commanders were killed or wounded. Despite the defeat, Hood continued to move against Thomas. Just two weeks later, Hood hurled the remnants of his army against the Yankees at Nashville with equally disastrous results.

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Treasure's Report
Mike Maillard

1 October 2012 thru 31 October 2012

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DATE
Disbursed/Received
Transaction
Amount
1 October 2012 . Total Begining Balance $2,892.81

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1 October 2012 . General Fund Beginning Balance $1,262.38

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31 October 2012 . General Fund Ending Balance $1,262.38
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1 October 2012 . Restoration Fund Beginning Balance $294.93

31 October 2012 . Restoration Fund Ending Balance $294.93
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1 October 2012 . Camp Blair 1864-1866 Memorial Fund Beginning Balance $1,335.50
31 October 2012 . Camp Blair 1864-1866 Memorial Fund Ending Balance $1,335.50
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31 October 2012 . Total Ending Balance $2,892.81

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The October 8, 2012 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Kyle Bublitz, Dan Conklin, Chris Cox, Henry Hawker, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Mark Heath, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Ron Tyrl, Charlie Waters Jr., Daniel Watkins and guest Dave Kimble.

Commander Hawker welcomed all to the October meeting and called for the Secretary's report which was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Waters, motion passed.

The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as amended by Brother Heath, seconded by Brother Watkins, to show the $100 sent to Camp 20 last month be taken from the restoration fund not the general fund, motion passed.

By-Laws Committee

The By-Laws committee: the By-Laws were sent to Department for their approval & filed.

Patriotic Instructor

Today's anniversary of the Battle of Perryville was discussed.

Graves Registration

1. Brother Maillard reported that research is being finalized on the "Medal of Honor" recipient, John Kelly, a gunboat crew member that has been confirmed to be interned in Mount Evergreen cemetery.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs up-dated the year's page and the new roster will be coming out soon.

Communications

1. Reminder of the Veteran's Day program Sunday, November 11th.

New Business

1. Commander Hawker reviewed some programs planned for the coming year: a gentleman from the Jackson County Genealogical Society will do a program on the "old bottle collection" he has from the 1800s, many being elixirs from that era. Department Representative Keith Harrison will review ceremonies & rituals, and proper uniform & accoutrements for assist our camp's participation in these programs. And Mr. Ron Jones will be bringing his 24th Michigan Infantry's relative's rifle and gear from his service in the "Iron Brigade". 2. Commander Hawker requested volunteers for the 2013 nomination committee: Brothers Cox, Lewis & Tyrl volunteered. Please forward interest in a camp position to Commander Hawker or this committee. 3. A summary of our Camp's participation at the Tompkins Center's "Freedom Festival & Steam Engine" event September 15 & 16 with the opening of the new one-room 1800s school house being the highlight of the event was discussed. 4. Treasurer Maillard motioned to give American Legion Post 29 our annual donation of $150 for the use of their facilities, seconded by Brother Heath; motion passed.

For the Good of the Order

1. Oct. 14, Sunday, Waterloo Pioneer Days 12:00 to 5:00pm. 2. Brother Heath announced the "Battle of Mississinewa", War of 1812 battle reenactment in Marion, Indiana this coming weekend October 12-14. 3. Auxiliary Roxie Mulvihill had books & magazines from Bob's collection available for those interested in them to have. 4. Brother Maillard showed the 71st National GAR Encampment book from 1937 in Madison, Wisconsin he just recently obtained and he will be present some of the more interesting points from the book at future meetings. 5. The Christmas party was finalized to be held at the Sandstone Church on December 9th at 1pm.

Commander Hawker proceeded to close the meeting at 8:05pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for November 12, 2012, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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From History in the Headlines:

Facts about
Arlington National Cemetery

Since 1868, Arlington National Cemetery has been the focal point of national Memorial Day commemorations. As the United States honors its fallen military heroes, explore eight surprising facts about one of the most sacred pieces of ground in America.

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1. Arlington National Cemetery is located on Confederate General Robert E. Lee's confiscated estate.

Days after resigning from the U.S. Army on April 20, 1861, to take command of Virginian forces in the Civil War, Robert E. Lee left the Arlington estate where he had married Mary Lee and lived for 30 years. He would never return. After Virginia seceded from the Union on May 23, 1861, Union troops crossed the Potomac River from the national capital and occupied the 200-acre property and house that been built by George Washington Parke Custis, Mary's father and the step-grandson of George Washington. After Mary Lee, confined to a wheelchair, sent a representative instead of appearing personally to pay a $92.07 tax bill, the government seized the property in 1864. With Washington, D.C., teeming with dead soldiers and out of burial space, Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs formally proposed Arlington as the location of a new military cemetery. On May 13, 1864, 21-year-old Private William Christman of Pennsylvania, who had died of peritonitis, became the first military man buried at Arlington. To ensure the house would forever be uninhabitable for the Lees, Meigs directed graves to be placed as close to the mansion as possible, and in 1866 he ordered the remains of 2,111 unknown Civil War soldiers killed on battlefields near Washington, D.C., to be placed inside a vault in the Lees' rose garden.

2. A Supreme Court ruling in 1882 could have resulted in the exhumation of 17,000 graves.

More than a decade after Lee's death, the Supreme Court ruled that the U.S. government had seized his estate without due process and ordered it returned to his family in the same condition as when it was illegally confiscated. If followed, the ruling could have required the exhumation of all of Arlington's dead, but instead Lee's son officially sold the property to Congress for $150,000 in 1883.

3. The cemetery hosted the first national Memorial Day commemoration in 1868.

In 1868, General John A. Logan, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, officially proclaimed May 30 as Decoration Day "for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion." The first national commemoration took place at Arlington on May 30, 1868, with General Ulysses S. Grant in attendance and General James Garfield as the featured speaker. Decoration Day was eventually renamed Memorial Day.

4. Arlington is the only national cemetery to hold servicemen from every war in U.S. history.

Although the first military burial at Arlington National Cemetery didn't occur until 1864, the burial ground holds the remains of those who fought in every war since the Revolution. In 1892, soldiers killed in the Revolutionary War were reinterred from a Georgetown cemetery, and casualties from the War of 1812 have been reburied at Arlington as well.

5. Three World War II enemy combatants are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Scattered among America's honored dead are two Italian prisoners of war and one German prisoner of war captured during World War II. The three enemy combatants died in captivity in the Washington, D.C., area, and the Geneva Conventions required proper burials. With Arlington being the closest national cemetery, the men were buried there. In total, there are approximately 60 foreign nationals interred in Arlington, most being allied servicemen who perished in air disasters that included American soldiers.

6. Nearly 4,000 former slaves are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

After seizing Lee's estate, the federal government set aside acreage to be a model community for emancipated, freed and fugitive slaves. Freedman's Village included farmland, homes, a hospital, a school and a mess hall before shuttering in 1900. African-Americans who lived at the village were buried on the property, and their graves were incorporated into Section 27 of Arlington National Cemetery. Their headstones are inscribed with "citizen" or "civilian."

7. There may never be another addition to the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Among the 5,000 unknowns entombed at Arlington are the unidentified remains of World War I, World War II and Korean War servicemen buried at the Tomb of the Unknowns. An unknown from the Vietnam War was entombed in 1984, but the remains were exhumed in 1998, positively identified by DNA testing as those of Air Force First Lieutenant Michael Joseph Blassie and reinterred at a military cemetery in Missouri. Advancements in DNA testing may mean that all future remains will be able to be positively identified and no future interments at the Tomb of the Unknowns will occur.

8. Soldiers plant flags in front of every tombstone on Memorial Day weekend.

On every Memorial Day weekend since 1948, troops in the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment—the Army's official ceremonial unit known as the "Old Guard"—have placed small American flags in front of all of Arlington's tombstones. Each flag is planted precisely one foot in front of a grave marker and perfectly centered. This year, 1,700 soldiers participated in the tradition known as "Flags-In." They planted approximately 220,000 flags on the Thursday evening before Memorial Day, and they will be removed at the holiday's conclusion.

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Upcoming Events


October: 2012
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
6th - Saturday & 7th - Sunday

The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center Spiegel Grove, Fremont, OH

Hayes Civil War Reenactment. This event is tenitive for the Camp. Please check back for further details.


Monday October 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
14th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 9998 Waterloo Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

6th - Saturday & 7th - Sunday

The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center Spiegel Grove, Fremont, OH

Hayes Civil War Reenactment. This event is tenitive for the Camp. Please check back for further details.


Monday October 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
14th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 9998 Waterloo Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

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November: 2012
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday November 3

Veterans Day Parade, Detroit.


Sunday November 4

Massing of the Colors. Michigan Historical Center Lansing.


Sunday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.


Monday November 12th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

Saturday November 3

Veterans Day Parade, Detroit.


Sunday November 4

Massing of the Colors. Michigan Historical Center Lansing.


Sunday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.


Monday November 12th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

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December: 2012
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
No regular meeting scheduled for December.


Check back for date

Fourteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.

No regular meeting scheduled for December.


Check back for date

Fourteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.

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