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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


October, 2014


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Carrying the Flag
5th Michigan Cavalry
October - 1864
The Officers Sackcoat
Michigan Money
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Brothers Of Camp 7

Since this is my last column as our commander I again want to thank you for all of your support and assistance over the last two year. I really enjoyed my time setting in the commanders chair, made much easier I'm sure, by each and every one of you, by putting in your time, and the hard work needed to "Keep green the Memory". I know you will continue to give that assistance to our new commander, Charlie Waters Jr., as well as our other elected officers of our Camp.

Remember to note on your calenders that we also changed our meeting months, we now meet every month but January and June.

Although the year is winding down, please remember that we, as a camp, still have work to do. At our next meeting we will be installing our new officers. There is also Veteran's Day ceremonies to attend and we will be closing out the year with our Christmas party again being hosted by the Ladies of our Auxiliary.

Once again, to all, a very heartfelt THANK YOU for your help and support over my time as commander. I truly enjoyed my time in that position.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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Officers Sackcoat


General Grant at Appomattox
Did you know that Union Officers did have a regulation sackcoat that they could wear? According to an article in the September/October Camp Chase Gazette By Hubbard G. Clapper, they did.

This coat differed from the one issued to soldiers in the ranks in several different ways. First of all it had 5 buttons not 4 in a single row, also each sleeve had 3 small buttons at the cuff, the enlisted mans coat had none. The coat was lined but only to the waist. It also had 3 external pockets as well as the inside pocket where the enlisted coat only had the inside pocket, and the tail of the coat went to the hip. It was usually made of 18 ounce wool, but some of corse, were heaver and of better quality wool if they were made by a private tailor for the officer. Officers would use the standard gilt shoulder boards to denote their rank. Some also elected to have black velvet collars and cuffs added to these coats.

These coats were especially popular with younger officers, as they were less expensive and the officers had to supply their own uniforms. It is noted that Brigadier General John Buford wore an officers sackcoat at McPherson's Ridge on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg.

We have all heard the story of the how General Grant was wearing an enlisted mans sackcoat at the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. It is pointed out, that if you examine the paintings or drawings of the time (unless you find one or two that actually shows him wearing the uniform of a Lt. Gen.) you will notice that he jacket has 5 buttons down the front and 3 smaller buttons on the sleeve. This means that reporters got it wrong in 1865, and according to this article, we're still getting it wrong going on 150 years later.

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Carrying the Regimental Flag

Carrying a regiment's colors into battle was considered an honor and a privilege. It was also a very dangerous job and would likely get a man maimed or killed. Thus, it required a great deal of courage.
Below is a portion of text excerpted from: My Story of the War: a Woman's Narrative of Four Years Personal Experience as Nurse in the Union Army... It is an excellent example of the grim outlook for the regimental color bearer.

"The fatality that attended the color-bearers, officers, and men of this regiment at the battle of Gettysburg was very great. It had in its ranks on the morning of this memorable fight four hundred and ninety-six officers and men. It lost in killed and wounded three hundred and sixteen. The 24th was a part of the Iron Brigade, which was the first infantry engaged at Gettysburg. It carried into this battle only a state flag, which was presented to the regiment by the citizens of Detroit. This was carried by Color-Bearer Abel G. Peck, a tall, straight, handsome man, and as brave a soldier as ever gave up his life for his country. Hide He was instantly killed almost at the beginning of the famous charge of the Iron Brigade. The flag was then seized by Private Thomas B. Ballou, who was desperately wounded immediately after, and died a few weeks later. The flag was then carried by Private August Ernst, who was instantly killed. Corporal Andrew Wagner then took the colors and carried them until shot through the breast, from the effects of which he died about a year after the close of the war.

When Corporal Wagner fell, Colonel Henry A. Morrill took the flag, and gallantly attempted to rally the few survivors of the regiment. But Private William Kelly insisted on carrying it, saying to Colonel Morrill, " You shall not carry the flag while I am alive." The gallant fellow held it aloft and almost instantly fell, shot through the heart. Private L. Spaulding then took the flag from the hands of Kelly, and carried it until he was himself badly wounded. Colonel Morrill again seized the flag, and was soon after shot in the head and carried from the field.

After the fall of Colonel Morrill, the flag was carried by a soldier whose name has never been ascertained. He was seen by Captain Edwards — who was now in command of the regiment — lying upon the ground badly wounded, grasping the flag in his hands. Captain Edwards took the flag from him and carried it himself until the few men left of the regiment fell back and reached Culp's Hill. Captain Edwards is the only man who is known to have carried the flag that day, who was not killed or wounded.

This grand old flag is no longer in existence. It was so riddled and torn with shot and shell that scarcely a square foot of it remained intact. The staff was shot and broken in pieces also. The men had great affection for the old flag, and after the battle of Gettysburg they agreed to cut it up and distribute the pieces to the survivors. This was done, and to-day in many a Michigan household a small piece of faded blue silk is cherished as one of the sacred mementoes of the war.

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Michigan Money

At the time of the Civil War many banks printed their own money.
Below is an example of one of those bills..

A $5 note from the Peninsular Bank Detroit

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October - 1864
Submitted by Ron Tyrl

August 13, 1864:
October 1, 1864:
“I can make this march and make Georgia howl.” Sherman October 2, 1864:
Rebecca Pomeroy’s (“one of the best women I ever knew” Lincoln) relationship with the Lincoln family would continue throughout the war. Though months might pass without their seeing each other, as matters of state concerned Lincoln and sick and wounded soldiers filled Pomeroy's time at the hospital, the Lincolns continued to visit or send gifts to the hospital and to request Pomeroy's presence at the White House in times of need. When Mary Lincoln was injured in a carriage accident in July 1863, Lincoln sent for Pomeroy, who stayed by Mary's bedside for three weeks. In October 1864, Lincoln received several threatening letters, and an anxious Mary sent for Pomeroy once more. Pomeroy agreed to go to the family, though only for "a short time, as I cannot be spared longer." This may have been the last time she saw them, though they were never far from her thoughts. At the beginning of April she wrote, "My soul is in the Lincoln family, and why I am so distressed for them all God only knows. Sometimes I think God has put this heavy burden upon me for some wise purpose best known to himself. My heart cries out to God in behalf of Mrs. Lincoln and our dear, good President. I feel that I can pray for him hourly."
Lincoln's assassination on April 14 ended the warm relationship between the woman he called "one of the best he ever knew" and the man she called "my dear friend, the President." Pomeroy would return to Chelsea, Massachusetts, where she founded a home for indigent women and quietly lived out the rest of her days. History would soon largely forget this woman, and she would become no more than a footnote in the story of Lincoln's presidency. In reality, however, she was a dear and trusted friend and confidant to both Lincolns, one who gave them strength through their darkest hours.

October 2, 1864:
Engagement at Saltville, Virginia

Oct 12, 1864,
Roger B. Taney (b.1777), US Supreme Court Chief Justice (1836-1864), died after serving over 28 years. He favored state’s rights and voided laws limiting the rights of slaveholders. In the 1857 Dred Scott case Taney ruled that blacks as slaves could not become citizens of the US.

October 19, 1864,
Cedar Creek” Sheridan vs. Early Battle of Cedar Creek Sheridan over Jubal Early’s rebels. “Sheridan’s counter-attack the most notable example of personal battlefield leadership in the war.” Like the folks at home, the officers and men believe that the victories of Sherman and Sheridan had made it only a matter of time before the Union prevails.

Oct 19,1864:
Philip Sheridan and his gelding horse Rienzi made their most famous ride to repulse an attack led by Lt. General Jubal A. Early at Cedar Creek, Virginia. Sheridan had been on his way back from a strategy session in Washington, D.C. when Early attacked. The Union scored a narrow victory which helped it secure the Shenandoah Valley. Thomas Buchanan Read later wrote a poem, "Sheridan‘s Ride," and created a painting immortalizing the Union general and his steed.

October 19, 1864:
Raid on St. Albans, Vermont.

October 23, 1864:
Forces led by Union Gen. Samuel R. Curtis defeated Confederate Gen. Stirling Price’s army in Missouri. Battle of Westport, Missouri.

October 1864:
John Mosby derailed an army pay train not far from Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, and relieved the Union officer of 173,000 dollars. This split equally between his men (Mosby never took a share), gave each 2,100 dollars, easily making them the highest paid soldiers on either side during the Civil War.

October 28, 1864:
Edward P. Davidson, 22 years old, with the 3rd Michigan Infantry Regiment, from Nunica, Ottawa County. Edward Davidson reenlisted February 26, 1864 and transfer to the 5th Michigan Infantry Regiment with a promotion to 2nd Lieutenant. He was Wounded in Action and taken Prisoner of war, October 27, 1864: at Boydton Plank Road, Virginia: The Battle of the Boydton Plank Road (also known as Burgess Mill or First Hatcher's Run), fought on October 27–28, 1864, followed the successful Battle of Peebles Farm in the Siege of Petersburg. It was an attempt by the Union Army to seize the Boydton Plank Road and cut the South Side Railroad, a critical supply line to Petersburg, Virginia. Edward Davidson survives the war and returns home to live a long productive life.

October 30, 1864:
16th Corps Detached, General Andrew Jackson Smith, “ We’ve been to Vicksburg, Red River, thorough Arkansas and Missouri and about everywhere else…and now we’re going to Hades if Old A.J. orders us.”

October 31, 1864:
Nevada became the 36th state under a proclamation signed by Pres. Lincoln.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The October 13, 2014 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Henry Hawker, Kim Horning, Dave Kimble, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof and Charlie Waters Jr. and guest: Dept. Commander Paul Davis.
Commander Lloyd welcomed Department Commander Davis and began the meeting by expressing that it's been an honor and a pleasure being the commander for the past two years.
The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Kimble and seconded by Brother Waters, motion passed.
Brother Maillard began the treasurer's report by summarizing the receipt of supplies ordered last month: 4 packs of membership cards, membership certificates, 6 ritual books, 4 membership and 1 junior badge, tie clasps and tacks also. The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.

Graves Registration

1. Brother Waters III continues to work with Hillcrest Cemetery for Private Pine's Flat Granite Marker that needs to be uncovered.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs has updated our Camp's website and facebook and will update the Quartermaster supplies with the new received items Treasurer Maillard ordered.

Communications

1. The camp received an invitation to participate in the Central Region Association of the Allied Orders' Annual Conference October 2-3, 2015.

Old Business

1. The Jackson Civil War roundtable meets tomorrow at 6:30 at the Meijer Library Branch.
2. Brother Griggs motioned to add the month of August and eliminate the January Camp meeting, seconded by Brother Tingley, motion passed. Brother Griggs will up-date the webpages and by-laws to reflect this change. Dept. Commander Davis approved the meeting months change while at the meeting.

New Business

1. The Nomination Committee proposed 2015 Camp positions:

Commander- Brother Waters Jr.
SVC- Brother Cox
JVC- Brother Kimble
Treasurer- Brother Maillard
Secretary- Brother Tyrl
Quartermaster- Brother Horning
Chaplain- Brother Van Hoof
Camp Council- Brothers Hawker, Lewis and Lloyd

Open to the floor nominations were requested and receiving no additions Brother Griggs motioned to accept the committee's recommendations seconded by Brother Horning, motion passed.
2. The Christmas party catered menu was passed around and Brother Griggs will e-mail all the selections and once decided selections are to be forwarded to Sister Weiss.
3. Brother Maillard took names to mass order the 150th Lincoln badge and coin offered in the last issue of the Banner.
4. Dept. Commander Davis met with Jackson JROTC Commander Paul Willis to see if he has an interest in our Camp's participation with his JROTC program. Brother Waters Jr. agreed to contact the JROTC to coordinate this participation.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming:

1. Mason's Veteran's Day parade is Saturday, November 8th, more details will be forwarded once received via e-mail.
2. Jackson Veteran's Day program Tuesday, November 11th at 11am at the Withington Monument.
3. Camp's Christmas Party, December 7th, Sunday, at Sandstone Church.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:45pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, November 10, 2014, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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Upcoming Events

October: 2014
4th - Saturday - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eaton Rapids

Fall Heritage Festival at the Miller Farm. Located at 635 State Street, Eaton Rapids Michigan


12th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan


Monday October 13th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
4th - Saturday - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eaton Rapids

Fall Heritage Festival at the Miller Farm. Located at 635 State Street, Eaton Rapids

12th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan


Monday October 13th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

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November: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday November 10th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Tuesday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.
1 p.m. Veterans Day Parade - Mason MI.

Monday November 10th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Tuesday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.
1 p.m. Veterans Day Parade - Mason MI.

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December: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
No regular meeting scheduled for December.


December 7

Sixteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.

No regular meeting scheduled for December.


December 7

Sixteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.


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Nashville Tennessee
It is reported that these people are watching the unfolding battle.

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Members of the 5th Michigan Cavalry.


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