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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


October, 2013


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Corinth, Mississippi 1862
The G.A.R. in Jackson
Railroads
Newspapers on Gettysburg
Meals in Camp
Tobacciana?
Gettysburg Address
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Gentlemen

If you were unable to attend our last meeting you missed Mike Maillard talking about the plaque for the Soldiers Plot at Mt. Evergreen Cemetery. Work seems to be moving right along with that project and all should be in place next spring for the re-dedication of that area. You also missed a very informative talk on the 7th Michigan Cavalry and the Michigan Cavalry Brigade given by author and living historian, Mike Wood. Again, thank you Mike for sharing you knowledge with members of our Camp.

Elections were also held with the results being;

Commander: Howard Lloyd
SVC: Charlie Waters Jr.
JVC: Chris Cox
Secretary; Ron Tyrl
Treasurer: Mike Maillard
Camp Council:
    PCC Henry Hawker,     PCC Ron Lewis,     PCC Jeff Oberdank

Joe Davis will remain Patriotic Instructor and Dave Kimble will step into the Chaplain's position. Congratulations gentlemen, I look forward to working with you throughout the coming year.

Don't forget to mark your calenders for the events upcoming in November. The Veterans Day events in Detroit, Spring Arbor, Jackson, and Mason. This year we will also be well represented at the Remembrance Day Ceremonies in Gettysburg.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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~ The Camp Cook ~

The Camp Cook

The camp kettles are large sheet-iron pails, one larger than the other so one can be put inside the other when moving. If we have meat and potatoes, meat is put into one and potatoes in the other. The one that gets cooked first is emptied into mess pans, which are large sheet-iron pans with flaring sides, so one can be packed in another. Then the coffee is put in the empty kettle and boiled. The bread is cut into thick slices and the breakfast call sounds. We grab our plates and cups and wait for no second invitation. We each get a piece of meat and a potato, a chunk of bread and a cup of coffee with a spoonful of brown sugar in it. Milk and butter we buy or go without. We save a piece of bread for the last, with which we wipe up everything and then eat the dish rag. Dinner and breakfast are alike, only sometimes the meat and potatoes are cut up and cooked together, which makes a delicious stew. The cooks are men detailed from the ranks for that purpose. I never yet saw the cooks wash their hands but presume they do when they go to the brook for water.

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The Second Battle of Corinth October 1862

"At the Battle of Corinth fought on the 3rd & 4th of October in 1862, Confederates under General Earl Van Dorn attempted to capture the vital rail center in Mississippi. However, the following day, the Second Battle of Corinth ended in defeat for the Rebels.

Northern Mississippi was the scene of much maneuvering during the summer of 1862. The Confederates were forced to evacuate Corinth in May in the face of heavy Union pressure, but they maintained two armies in the area. On September 19, one of these armies, commanded by Van Dorn, was defeated by Union General William Rosecrans at the Battle of Iuka, 20 miles east of Corinth. Shortly after, Van Dorn combined his force with that of General Sterling Price to form a 22,000-man army that turned toward Corinth to launch another attack against Rosecrans, who had consolidated his forces there.

Van Dorn hurled his army at the outer defenses of Corinth on the morning of October 3. Over the course of the spring and summer, both Union and Confederate occupiers of Corinth had constructed concentric rings of trenches around the city. The Confederates were initially successful at capturing the outer defenses, driving the 23,000 defenders back nearly two miles. The battle lasted all day, and only nightfall brought relief to the battered Yankees.

The next day, the Confederates made a series of desperate assaults on the inner trenches. They suffered heavy losses and began to withdraw from Corinth by early afternoon. The Confederate defeat was devastating. The Union losses included 315 dead, 1,812 wounded, and 232 taken as prisoners, while the Confederate losses included 1,423 dead, 5,692 wounded, and 2,268 prisoners. The Confederate defeat at Corinth allowed the Union to focus attention on capturing Vicksburg, Mississippi, the last major Rebel stronghold on the Mississippi River.

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Other Lables that were used

After the Civil War many companies rushed to cash in on the cerlebity status of some of the major players. One of those was the tobacco industry. Below you will find a couple of others who have used the Civil War to sell their items.

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~ Railroads ~
Submitted by Joe Davis

Both sides in the Civil War used their railroads effectively to move troops, arms and materiel. As early as the First Battle of Bull Run, Stonewall Jackson and Joe Johnston marched thousands of Confederates from Winchester to the Manassas Gap railroad, arriving at Manassas just in time to help turn the tide of the battle.

In one of the greatest logistical feats of the war, President Lincoln sent thousands reinforcements from eastern Virginia to the Chattanooga region in late September 1863. The well-coordinated operation allowed the Union army to transfer two army corps more than 1,000 miles in just one week. Army of the Potomac troops under General Hooker arrived in the aftermath of the Union defeat at Chickamauga and would go on victory at Lookout Mountain in November.

Just prior to Chickamauga, the Confederates had pulled off a similar feat, sending two divisions to northern Georgia---the long way; with the Union advance into East Tennessee, which cut rail lines from Virginia and North Carolina into the region, Longstreet's troops needed to first travel south to Atlanta, and then up toward Chattanooga.

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Reporting on the

Presidents address at Gettysburg


The President address at the National Cemetery in Gettysburg on November 19 received different coverage from different newspapers. Frank Leslie's Illustrated started its coverage of the event with a description of the area and weather. They then continued;

The ceremonies began with a prayer by the Rev. Dr. Stockton, Chaplain of the House of Representatives. The Hon. Edward Everett then delivered his address, (click here to see Edward Everett's speech) one of the classic eloquent orations which have no equal in this country. Recalling the honors paid by Athens to her fallen brave, he spoke of the occasion which called them together, of the importance to all of the great battle, and what that victory effected. After glancing at the early history of the war, he gave an elaborate and highly-wrought account of the battle.

At the close President Lincoln address the assembly:

"Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing the question whether this nation or any nation so conceived, so dedicated can long endure. We are met on the great battlefield of that war. We are met to dedicate it, on a portion of the field set apart as the final resting place of those who gave their lives for the nation's life; but the nation must live, and it is altogether fitting that we should do this.

In a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground in reality. The number of men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor attempts to add to is consecration the world will little know and nothing remember of what we see here, but we cannot forget what the brave men did here. We ow this offering to our dead. We imbibe increased devotion for that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion; we here might resolve that they shall not have died in vain; that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom and that the Government of the people, shall not perish from the earth."

I'm sure that is not the way you remember memorizing it as a child, and it make one wonder where they got their copy of the speech from.

Harpers Weekly did not print the text of the Presidents speech but did talk about it in an editorial. They said:

"The President and the Cabinet were there, with famous soldiers and civilians. The oration by Mr. Everett was smooth and cold. Delivered doubtless, with his accustomed graces, it yet wanted one stirring though, one vivid picture, one thrilling appeal.

The few words of the President were from the heart to the heart. They can not be read, even, without kindling emotion. ‘The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.' It was as simple and felicitous and earnest a word as was ever spoken.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The October 14, 2013 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Kyle Bublitz, Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Dave Kimble, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Roger Manning, Jeff Oberdank, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof and Charlie Waters Jr. Guest: Michigan Cavalry Brigade reenactor and Author Mike Wood.

Commander Lloyd welcomed our guest Mike Wood and thanked him for offering his presentation on the "Michigan Cavalry Brigade." The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Waters and seconded by Brother Davis, motion passed.

The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Griggs, and seconded by Brother Oberdank, motion passed.

Treasurer Maillard summarized the Mt Evergreen "Soldier's Cemetery Sign replacement progress: Bailey Gravel has donated the selected bolder, Jackson Monument will install the ordered plaque, Jackson Parks Department will provide the base for the placement of the stone and Brother Maillard had the finalized proposed draft of the wording for the plaque that if agreed upon will be sent to "Centec" Fremont, Ohio Memorial Company to produce the plaque. The draft was approved.
Three Civil War Veteran 1861-1865 flag holders motioned to be purchased last meeting will also be ordered for Camp supplies. Treasurer Maillard reported that through his contacts with the Jackson Economic Development folks a $1,000 grant will be given to assist in this sign replacement which will cover the costs. A round of applause was given for Treasurer Maillard's work and accomplishments on this project.

Patriotic Instructor

Brother Joe Davis summarized the up-coming schedule of events for the camp and encouraged book and other items of interest exchange within the camp

Graves Registration

1. Brother Maillard read Brother Waters III.'s report which he reported he continues to answer and research requests for veteran information and he's currently working on a Kent County Medal of Honor veteran.
2. Also the Kent County Camp is requesting information on our Camp's stone puller tripod set-up which we are providing.

Old Business

1. Brother Waters III reported nothing new on the Medal of Honor John Kelly stone being finalized by the Medal of Honor Society.
2. Brother Cox continues to coordinate the "100 Year Camp Celebration" for the Camp's up-coming 2014 anniversary, 1914-2014.
3. Brother's Cox & Van Hoff's Veteran Stone Dedications are planned for 2014.

New Business

1. 2014 Camp position nominations: Commander Howard Lloyd agreed to continue for another year. Treasurer Mike Maillard, Secretary Ron Tyrl, SVC Charlie Waters Jr., JVC Chris Cox. Brother Dave Kimble agreed to the Chaplain position vacated by Brother Cox taking the JVC position. Camp Council: Henry Hawker PCC, Ron Lewis agreed to continue and Brother Jeff Oberdank agreed to assist in this council.
2. Installation will be done during the November Meeting.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming for the coming year:

1. November 9th, Saturday, Detroit Veterans Day Parade, contact Commander Howard for details.

2. November 10th, Sunday, Spring Arbor Rehab Center Veterans Program scheduled at 2:30pm, Brenda Walters Point of Contact.

3. November 11th, Monday, Jackson Veterans Day Program, positioning at 10am at the Withington Monument and then the Camp will assist with the Mason Michigan Veterans Day parade starting at 3pm.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:50pm after Mike Wood's very well done "Michigan Cavalry Brigade Program". Our next camp meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, November 12, 2013, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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The Presidents address at Gettysburg.

from the New York Times

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"When the Boys in Blue Are Gone"
John Hendriks

John Hendricks was the last living Veteran of the 89th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

When the comrades have departed,
When the veterans are no more,
When the bugle call is sounded
On that everlasting shore.
When life's weary march is ended,
When campfires slumber long;
Who will tell the world the story,
When the boys in Blue are gone?

Who will tell about their marching,
From Atlanta to the Sea?
Who will halt, and wait, and listen,
When they hear the reveille?
Who will join to swell the chorus,
Of some old, Grand Army song?
Who will tell the world the story,
When the boys in Blue are gone?

Sons and daughters of this nation,
You must tell of triumphs won;
When on earth our work is ended,
And the Veteran claims his own.
You must all cherish Old Glory,
And its teachings pass along.
You must tell the world the story,
When the boys in Blue are gone.

To that flag, our country's emblem,
You must pledge allegiance, too.
To that flag, our nation's emblem,
May your hearts be ever true.
That the nation be protected,
'Gainst injustice, and all wrong;
You must tell the world the story,
When the boys in Blue are gone.

You must keep your country's honor,
From each stripe withhold all stain;
You must take the Veteran's places,
And repeat the roll of fame.
You must keep your country's honor,
And your flag above all wrong,
Then we'll trust you with the story,
When the boys in Blue are gone.

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Upcoming Events



October: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
6th - Saturday & Sunday - 5th & 6th

The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center Spiegel Grove, Fremont, OH

Hayes Civil War Reenactment. This event is tenitive for the Camp. Please check back for further details.


13th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan


Monday October 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
6th - Saturday & Sunday - 5th & 6th

The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center Spiegel Grove, Fremont, OH

Hayes Civil War Reenactment. This event is tenitive for the Camp. Please check back for further details.


13th - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Pioneer Day. 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan


Monday October 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

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November: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday November 9th

Veterans Day Parade, Detroit.


Monday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.


Monday November 11th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

Saturday November 9th

Veterans Day Parade, Detroit.


Monday November 11th;

Veterans Day
11 a.m. Jackson Defence of the Flag Monument.


Monday November 11th;

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

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December: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
No regular meeting scheduled for December.


Check back for date

Fifteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.

No regular meeting scheduled for December.


Check back for date

Fifteenth Annual Christmas Party Sandstone Congregational Church 250 S. Sandstone Rd., Jackson MI. This, is a tenitive location. Please check back for further details.

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Banks of the Chickahominy.

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The G.A.R. in Jackson

Ribbons from the G.A.R. in Jackson.


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