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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


July, 2014


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
History - Fort Wayne Detroit
23rd Michigan
Interesting Facts
The Battle of Darbytown Road
Captain Allen Zacharias
Michigan Money
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Huzzah! To the men in Blue;

I would first like to thank Department Commander Paul Davis for his attendance at our last meeting. It is always a pleasure Sir, to have you attend.

It was a very informative meeting as Mike filled us in with what he had accomplished so far on the Soldiers Cemetery Dedication. After holding discussions on other points we have a date set for the dedication. I hope you will all be able to make it there on the 9th of August to assist and support our Camp in this important project.

Also remember we have many events upcoming before the first of September. Concord Civil War Day is being held Saturday July 26. As those of us who attending this event regularly can tell you, this is always a lot of fun. If you haven't made it before please try. Daniel has but in a lot of work (thank you for that Sir) for the battle this year and it promises to be one of the best yet. The first week of August will find us assisting at the Ella Sharp Civil War Camp. Camp members will be needed to help cover Tuesday the 5th, Wednesday the 6th, and Thursday the 7th of that week. If you will be able to help out please contact Chris. On Wednesday the 20th Brothers will be assisting the G. A. R. Memorial Hall and Museum as they put on their 1st Civil War Day Camp. Then we have the biggie, the Jackson Civil War Muster. That will be held on the 23rd and 24th of August.

As you can see, the summer might be winding down but our work is not. Hope to see you all at some of the event.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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Soldier Stories from Antietam: Captain Allen Zacharias, 7th Michigan Infantry From the http://antietamjournal.blogspot.com website


Photo credit: Michigan Capitol Committee-photographer Peter Glendinning. Thank you.
Allen Zacharias was born on May 15, 1833, in Clear Springs, Maryland, a community in Washington County, where the Battle of Antietam would one day be fought. When he was 8 years old, he and his family moved to Monroe County, Michigan, where they remained for many years. Zacharias remained in Michigan for his education, attending the University of Michigan where he graduated in 1860. Upon his graduation, Zacharias moved to Mississippi and worked as an instructor at a State Military Institute.

It was not long after his move to Mississippi that hostilities began between the North and the South. Having been raised in Michigan, Zacharias returned to his home state and enlisted as a corporal in Company K of the 7th Michigan, and he rose to the rank of 1st Lieutenant on June 25, 1861. At that time, Zacharias was 28 years old. On March 10, 1862, he was commissioned a Captain in the same regiment. He served with the 7th Michigan during many battles and engagements in the summer of 1862, including those during George McClellan's Peninsula Campaign. On June 28, near Fair Oaks, Virginia, Zacharias wrote the following in his pocket book, expressing a fear that he would soon be killed and he would become one of the many dead buried as unknown soldiers.

Allan Howard Zacharias was born May 15th, 1833, in Clear Springs, Washington County, Maryland, and removed with his father to Monroe County, Michigan, in 1841. Graduated A.B. from University of Michigan, June 1860. Went to Mississippi in September, and became a professor, and in February, 1861, principal of the State Military Institute, at Brandon, in that State. Resigned his position in May and returned to Michigan, when, from a solemn sense of duty, he enlisted as a corporal, and promoted first lieutenant June 25th, and to a captaincy March 10, 1862 and was with the regiment at Yorktown, West Point, and Fair Oaks, May 31 and June 1st.
Friend--if you find my body lifeless upon the field, bury it decently, mark its resting place, and inform my friends in the regiment and my father. Do this and you shall be liberally rewarded and have the gratitude of my friends.

A.H. Zacharias, Captain, Company K, 7th Michigan

While Captain Zacharias had gone to the trouble of writing out this note in his pocket book during the Peninsula Campaign, he would not need it then. Zacharias survived that campaign unharmed, but he was not so fortunate at the Battle of Antietam. As a part of John Sedgwick's Division of Edwin Sumner's 2nd Corps, the 7th Michigan saw significant action on September 17, 1862. They were in Napoleon Jackson Tecumseh Dana's Brigade in the second line of Union troops from Sedgwick's Division in the West Woods, roughly 50 to 100 yards behind the lead line of Willis Gorman's Brigade. When a strong Confederate counterattack swept into the woodlot and on to their left flank, the 7th Michigan was caught with its left flank exposed, along with the rest of Sedgwick's men. Dana's brigade suffered heavily, losing 898 casualties in less than an hour of fighting in the West Woods. The 7th Michigan alone lost 221 men killed, wounded, and missing. With thousands of Confederates under the command of generals such as Lafeyette McLaws, Jubal Early, William Barksdale, and Joseph Kershaw bearing down upon them, these Federals had little choice other than to retreat from the field.

Following the fierce fighting in the West Woods, a soldier from Maine came across a severely wounded man holding a letter in his hand. The letter was as follows:

To Peter K. Zacharias, Monroe, Michigan:

Dear Parents, Brothers, and Sisters--I am wounded mortally, I think. The fight rages around me. I have done my duty; this is my consolation. I hope to meet you all again. I left not the line until nearly all had fallen and colors gone. I am getting weak; my arms are free, but my chest all is numb. The enemy trotting over me, the numbness up to my heart. Goodbye, all.

Your son, Allen.

While Captain Zacharias had taken the time to write a letter home to tell his family of his impending death, he would last longer than he expected. The soldier from Maine who found the Captain mailed the letter home, telling the Zacharias family of their loved one's fate. Allen Zacharias would live several more months before he succumbed to his wounds. He died on December 31, 1862, in a hospital in Hagerstown, Maryland. His words show that in what he thought were his last hours on Earth, Zacharias was concerned for his family, so much so that he went to the effort of writing a goodbye letter. This story was repeated on numerous battlefields countless of times during the war, showing just a glimpse of the humanity and fear that Civil War soldiers had during combat.

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Fort Wayne - Detroit.

History of Fort Wayne

In the late 1830s, small, short-lived rebellions occurred in Canada to protest corruption amongst its colonial government. Many Americans believed there was widespread Canadian support for these rebellions and formed volunteer militias to overthrow Canada's colonial government. This led to a series of militia attacks on Canada known as the Patriot War. American troops were mustered to suppress the American volunteers and maintain America's official neutrality in the conflict. However, at the same time, the United States government realized there was a lack of fortifications along the northern border to repel a potential British attack, and in particular, no counterpart to the British Fort Malden located in Amherstburg. In 1841, Congress appropriated funds to build a chain of forts stretching from the east coast to the Minnesota Territory, including one at Detroit.

Soon afterward, the Army sent Lieutenant Montgomery C. Meigs to Detroit. Meigs bought up riverfront farm property three miles below Detroit, in Springwells Township, at the point on the Detroit River closest to Canada. Construction on the fort began in 1842, with Meigs superintending. The original fortifications were cedar-reveted earthen walls. The fort was completed in 1851, costing $150,000. The Army named the new fort for Revolutionary War hero General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, who had taken possession of Detroit from the British in 1796.

Architecture and construction

The original fort is star-patterned, with walls of earthen ramparts faced with cedar, covering vaulted brick tunnels that contain artillery ports. The design was based on fortifications developed by Sebastian Vauban, a 17th-century French military engineer, and modified by Dennis Hart Mahan. Artillery emplacements are atop the walls, designed for 10-inch (250 mm) cannons mounted to fire over the parapet, although there is no indication that artillery intended for the fort was ever installed. There is a dry moat surrounding the fort, and a demilune facing the river.

Before any cannon had been installed at the newly constructed Fort Wayne, the United States and Britain peacefully resolved their differences, eliminating the need for a fort on the Detroit River. Fort Wayne remained unused for a decade after its initial construction, manned only by a single watchman. There is evidence suggesting that the fort was a final stop on the Underground Railroad during these dormant years, as the Irish farmer who lived next to the fort's demilune operated a small ferry to Canada to supplement his income, the only such ferry in this part of the city at that time.

In 1861, the American Civil War again made Fort Wayne relevant. British sympathy for the Confederacy renewed fears of an attack from Canada, leading to a reconstruction and strengthening of the fort walls. Two weeks after the beginning of the war, the Michigan 1st Volunteer Infantry Regiment was mustered into service at Fort Wayne. For the rest of the Civil War, the fort served as a mustering center for troops from Michigan, as well as a place for veterans to recover from their wounds. Alfred Gibbs was the first commander to occupy the fort, serving his parole at Fort Wayne after being captured by the Confederacy.

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Michigan Money

At the time of the Civil War many banks printed their own money.
Below is an example of one of those bills..

A $5 note from the Exchange Bank from Marshall Michigan

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~ Interesting Facts ~
Submitted by Ron Tyrl


Forty-one percent of all northern white men born between 1822 and 1845 served in the Union army, and the numbers soared to 60 percent for those born between 1837 and 1845 and to over 80 percent for those born in 1843 and turned 18 in the war's first year.

When a man entered the services his chances of dying there were about 1 in 4. Being killed in action was about 1 in 65, dying from wounds received 1 in 56, dying from disease about 1 in 13.5, being wounded 1 in 10. Captured or MIA about 1 in 15, and if captured your chances of dying in prison were about 1 in 7. The number of men reporting for sick call throughout the way was about 6 million-meaning that everyman in the Union army, on average was sick 3 times.

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The Battle of Darbytown Road

A Confederate attempt to regain ground that had been lost around Richmond, Virginia, is thwarted when Union troops turn back General Robert E. Lee's assault at the Battle of Darbytown Road.

In the summer of 1864, the campaign between Lee and Union General Ulysses S. Grant ground to a halt at Petersburg, 25 miles south of Richmond. The two great armies settled into trenches for a siege, and the lines soon extended all the way back to Richmond. Grant periodically attacked portions of the Rebel defenses but was not successful. On September 29, Union forces captured part of Richmond's outer defense at the Battle of New Market Heights. Although Richmond was still safely in Confederate hands, Lee was concerned about the new position of the Yankee troops.

Lee sent two divisions under generals Charles Field and Robert Hoke to move around the end of the Union line. Lee hoped that the Federal flank could be turned and the Confederates could regain the defensive works lost the week before. On the morning of October 7, the Confederates moved down Darbytown Road and around the Union right flank and attacked 1,700 cavalrymen. The assault sent the Yankees into a quick retreat. The Confederates captured eight cannons and drove the Union troops into the breastworks of General Alfred Terry. Alerted to the advancing Confederates, Terry summoned reinforcements to his position. By the time the Confederates worked their way through the thick foliage, they faced a strong Union force. Lee ordered an attack anyway. Brigades advanced one at a time, and the Yankee artillery tore the lines apart. By the afternoon, the Confederates withdrew to their original position. They lost 700 men while the Yankees lost only 400, and no ground was gained. Lee did not make another attempt to regain the ground and focused instead on setting up defenses closer to Richmond.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The July 13, 2014 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Henry Hawker, Mark Heath, Kim Horning, Dave Kimble, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Nathan Tingley, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof and Charlie Waters Jr. and guest: Dept. Commander Paul Davis.
Commander Lloyd welcomed Department Commander Davis and opened the meeting.
The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Tingley and seconded by Brother Griggs, motion passed.
The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Tingley and seconded by Brother Griggs, motion passed.

Graves Registration

1. Brother Waters III continues to work with Hillcrest Cemetery for Private Pine's Flat Granite Marker that needs to be uncovered.

Communications

1. The camp received an invitation to participate at the Grass Lake, Michigan "Heritage Days Festival" September 6, 2014.

Old Business

1. Brother Cox reported that Ella Sharp Museum will possibly loan one of the three GAR Post 48 chairs to the Eaton Rapids GAR Museum. GAR Museum's Keith Harrison will be notified of this loan possibility.

New Business

1. Brother Maillard reviewed the plans for the Dedication Program for the New "Soldier's Cemetery Stone and Plaque" that was installed and placed this month on the stone's footing. August 9th, Saturday at 2pm was decided as the date and time. The program will cover the purpose of the cemetery and placement of the plaque and stone, history of this project, and restoration activities. Discussion on details was held and more to follow as the program nears via email.
2. Brother Cox motioned to purchase a "streamer ring" for the Camp's flag to ensure the upkeep of the streamers. The motion was seconded by Brother Griggs, motion passed.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming:

1. July 26, Saturday, Concord "Civil War Days" at the Hubbard-Paddock" Museum.
2. August 5-7, Tuesday- Friday, Ella Sharp Museum's Civil War program, Brother Cox the Point of Contact.
3. August 9, Saturday, Soldier's Cemetery Stone Dedication.
4. August 20, Wednesday, Eaton Rapid's GAR Day Camp program.
5. August 23-24, Sat-Sun, "Jackson Civil War Muster" Cascades Park, set up at 1pm Friday at the Camp site and Band Shell.
6. September 6, Saturday, Grass Lake's "Heritage Days Festival", more details to follow via email.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:40pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, September 8, 2014, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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"Wounded Horse"
By Jeanne Losey

A dead horse found on the Antietam Battlefield.

The darkness settled softly down;
The battlefield was still.
The soldiers tried to rest a bit.
There was no need to kill.

But, on the battlefield, there lay
The wounded and the dead,
And, winding though the carnage there,
A stream was running red.

With blood of men who bravely fought
And gave their lives in vain,
And men who writhed and screamed and cried
In agonizing pain.

Sometimes a horse would whinny, too,
A shrill and piercing shriek
That finally died away at last
As he became too weak

To call out for his master, who,
Perhaps, lay by his side,
But never answered to that call
Because he, too, had died.

The horses did not understand
The Noise, the sights, the smell,
But they obeyed their master's touch,
Which led them straight to hell.

They tried to pull back from the fray,
For they were terrified,
But many times, in battles there,
Both horse and rider died.

The dead and dying on the field
Lay waiting for the dawn,
For when the blazing sun came up,
The battle would go on.

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Upcoming Events

July: 2014

Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday July 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Firday - Sunday July 18th - 20th Hastings

Civil War Muster Charlton Park


26th - Saturday all day Concord

Concord Civil War Days Hubbard House.

Monday July 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Firday - Sunday July 18th - 20th Hastings

Civil War Muster Charlton Park


26th - Saturday all day Concord

Concord Civil War Days Hubbard House.

August: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
No regular meeting is scheduled for August.


Saturday 9th Mt. Evergreen Jackson 2 p.m.

Monument Dedication Soldiers Cemetery within Mt. Evergreen


Saturday 23rd & Sunday 24th All day Jackson

Jackson Annual Civil War Muster.
Look for us in the band shell.

No regular meeting is scheduled for August.


Saturday 9th Mt. Evergreen Jackson 2 p.m.

Monument Dedication Soldiers Cemetery within Mt. Evergreen


Saturday 23rd & Sunday August 24th;

Jackson Annual Civil War Muster.
Look for us next to the band shell.

September: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday September 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest speaker with be Mike Culp from the 13th Michigan Association
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome)
Monday September 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest speaker with be Mike Culp from the 13th Michigan Association
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).

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Lt. Col Gilbert E. Pratt 23rd Michigan.

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Recruiting poster and reunion ribbons for the Michigan 23rd Volunteer Infantry.


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