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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


May, 2015


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In this issue

Letter to President Lincoln
Secretary's Report
Modern Medicine?
The G.A.R. in Michigan
Capture of Jefferson Davis
Michigan Money
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


On September 28, 1863, corporeal James Gooding sent a letter to president Lincoln about the inequalities of the pay between black and white soldiers. Gooding was an educated freed slave who had enlisted in the 54th Massachusetts. He would later find out first hand how southerners treated their prisoners, when on February 20, 1864, after he was wounded at the Battle of Olustee, he was captured and sent to Andersonville, where five months later, July 19, 1864 he was to die.

Below is the letter he sent to President Lincoln;


Corporeal Gooding's Headstone
Andersonville National Cemetery

Morris Island, S.C.

September 28, 1863

Your Excellency, Abraham Lincoln:

Your Excellency will pardon the presumption of an humble individual like myself, in addressing you, but the earnest solicitation of my comrades in arms besides the genuine interest felt by myself in the matter is my excuse, for placing before the Executive head of the Nation our Common Grievance.

On the 6th of the last Month, the Paymaster of the Department informed us, that if we would decide to receive the sum of $10 (ten dollars) per month, he would come and pay us that sum, but that, on the sitting of Congress, the Regt. [regiment] would, in his opinion, be allowed the other 3 (three). He did not give us any guarantee that this would be, as he hoped; certainly he had no authority for making any such guarantee, and we cannot suppose him acting in any way interested.

Now the main question is, are we Soldiers, or are we Laborers? We are fully armed, and equipped, have done all the various duties pertaining to a Soldier’s life, have conducted ourselves to the complete satisfaction of General Officers, who were, if anything, prejudiced against us, but who now accord us all the encouragement and honors due us; have shared the perils and labor of reducing the first stronghold that flaunted a Traitor Flag; and more, Mr. President, today the Anglo Saxon Mother, Wife, or Sister are not alone in tears for departed Sons, Husbands, and Brothers. The patient, trusting descendant of Africa’s Clime have dyed the ground with blood, in defence of the Union, and Democracy. Men, too, your Excellency, who know in a measure the cruelties of the iron heel of oppression, which in years gone by, the very power their blood is now being spilled to maintain, ever ground them in the dust.

But when the war trumpet sounded o’er the land, when men knew not the Friend from the Traitor, the black man laid his life at the altar of the Nation,—and he was refused. When the arms of the Union were beaten, in the first year of the war, and the Executive called for more food for its ravenous maw, again the black man begged the privilege of aiding his country in her need, to be again refused.

And now he is in the War, and how has he conducted himself? Let their dusky forms rise up, out of the mires of James Island, and give the answer. Let the rich mould around Wagner’s parapet be upturned, and there will be found an eloquent answer. Obedient and patient and solid as a wall are they. All we lack is a paler hue and a better acquaintance with the alphabet.

Now your Excellency, we have done a Soldier’s duty. Why can’t we have a Soldier’s pay? You caution the Rebel chieftain, that the United States knows no distinction in her soldiers. She insists on having all her soldiers of whatever creed or color, to be treated according to the usages of War. Now if the United States exacts uniformity of treatment of her soldiers from the insurgents, would it not be well and consistent to set the example herself by paying all her soldiers alike?

We of this Regt. were not enlisted under any “contraband” act. But we do not wish to be understood as rating our service of more value to the Government than the service of the ex-slave. Their service is undoubtedly worth much to the Nation, but Congress made express provision touching their case, as slaves freed by military necessity, and assuming the Government to be their temporary Guardian. Not so with us. Freemen by birth and consequently having the advantage of thinking and acting for ourselves so far as the Laws would allow us, we do not consider ourselves fit subjects for the Contraband act.

We appeal to you, Sir, as the Executive of the Nation, to have us justly dealt with. The Regt. do pray that they be assured their service will be fairly appreciated by paying them as American Soldiers, not as menial hirelings. Black men, you may well know, are poor; three dollars per month, for a year, will supply their needy wives and little ones with fuel. If you, as Chief Magistrate of the Nation, will assure us of our whole pay, we are content. Our Patriotism, our enthusiasm will have a new impetus, to exert our energy more and more to aid our Country. Not that our hearts ever flagged in devotion, spite the evident apathy displayed in our behalf, but we feel as though our country spurned us, now we are sworn to serve her. Please give this a moment’s attention.

Crop'l James Henry Gooding

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The Capture of Jefferson Davis
From Harper's Weekly
May 27, 1865

A Picked company of Wilson's command captured Jefferson Davis on the morning of May 10, at Irwinsville, Georgia. The company was commanded by Colonel PRITCHARD, of the Fourth Michigan. The following General 'Wilson's dispatch announcing the capture :

MACON, GA., 9.30 A.M., May 13, 1865. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Sec. of War: Lieut.-Colonel HARDEN, commanding the First Wisconsin, has just arrived from Irwinsville. He struck the trail of Davis at Dublin, Laurens County, on the evening of the 7th, and followed him closely, night and day, through the pine wilderness of Alligator Creek and Green Swamps, via Cumberlandsville to Irwinsville. At Cumberlandsville Colonel HARDEN met Colonel PRITCHARD, with 150 picked men and horses of the Fourth Michigan. HARDEN followed the trail directly south, while PRITCHARD,

having fresher horses, pushed down the Ocmulgee toward Hopewell, and thence by House Creek to Irwinsville, arriving there at midnight of the 9th Jeff Davis had not arrived. From a citizen PRITCHARD learned that his party were encamped two miles out of the town. He made dispositions of his men, and surrounded the camp before day. HARDEN had camped at 9 P.M. within two miles, as he afterward learned, from Davis. The trail being too indistinct to follow, he pushed on at 3 A.M., and had gone but little more than one mile when his advance was fired upon by men of the Fourth Michigan. . A fight ensued, both parties exhibiting the greatest determination. Fifteen minutes elapsed before the mistake was discovered. The firing in this skirmish was the first warning that Davis received. The captors report that he hastily put on one of his wife's dresses and started for the woods, closely followed by our men, who at first thought him a woman, but seeing his boots while he was running, they suspected his sex at once. The race was a short one, and the rebel President was soon brought to bay. He brandished a bowie-knife and showed signs of battle, but yielded promptly to the persuasions of COLT's revolvers, without compelling the men to fire. He expressed great indignation at the energy with which he was pursued, saying that he had believed our Government were too magnanimous to hunt down women and children. Mrs. Davis remarked to Colonel HARDEN, after the excitement was over, that the men had better not provoke the President, or "he might hurt some of 'em." REAGAN behaves himself with dignity and resignation. The party, evidently, were making for the coast. J. H. WILSON, Brevet Major-General.

The captured party included Davis's family, with Reagan, Postmaster-General; Colonel HARRISON, Private Secretary ; Colonel JOHNSON, Aid-de-Camp; Col. MORRIS, Colonel LUBBICK, Lieut. HATHAWAY. and others.

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The Start of
Modern Medicine

The Civil War began during medieval medicine's last gasp and ended at the dawn of modern medicine. Each side entered the war with puny squads of physicians trained by textbook, if at all. Four years later, legions of field-tested doctors, well-versed in anatomy, anesthesia and surgical practice, were poised to make great medical leaps.

The nation's first ambulance corps, organized to rush wounded soldiers to battlefront hospitals and using wagons developed and deployed for that purpose, was created during the Civil War. The idea was to collect wounded soldiers from the field, take them to a dressing station and then transport them to the field hospital.

Doctors laid out the hospitals as camps divided into well-defined wards for specific activities such as surgery and convalescence. Women flocked to serve these hospitals as nurses.

Before the war, most people received health care at home. After the war, hospitals adapted from the battlefront model cropped up all over the country. The ambulance and nurses' corps became fixtures, with the Civil War's most famous nurse, Clara Barton, going on to establish the American Red Cross. Today's modern hospital is a direct descendant of these first medical centers.".

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Michigan Money

At the time of the Civil War many banks printed their own money.
Below is an example of one of those bills..

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The May 11, 2015 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Bob Griggs, Henry Hawker, Kyle Hamann, Kim Horning, Howard Lloyd, Roger Manning, Nathan Tingley, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof, Charlie Waters III and Charlie Waters Jr. Guest: PDC Paul Davis.

The Secretary’s report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.
The Treasurer’s Report was motioned accepted as presented by Brother Tingley, in Treasurer Maillard's absence, by Brother Van Hoof and seconded by Brother Griggs motion passed.

Patriotic Instructor

In Brother Davis's absence Brother Griggs filling the Patriotic Instructor summarized Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart's anniversary of their deaths in battle. 5th Michigan Cavalry's John Huff killed Stuart in battle.

Graves Registration

Brother Waters III reported that the Soldier Stones at Mt. Evergreen will be cleaned next year.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs has updated the 2015 pages with pictures sent from the Lincoln Funeral Train event last weekend at Springfield, Illinois many Camp members attended.
2. The 4th Michigan Cavalry plaque program for Andrew Bee attended by Camp members pictures was also posted.

Old Business

1. The May 21st Paragon School program being held at the Eaton Rapid's GAR Hall & Island itinerary was reviewed by coordinator Brother Griggs.
2. Brother Van Hoof thank the Camp for the assistance at the Day of Prayer program he coordinated.
3. Brother Nate Tingley is continuing to coordinate a "Bean School" program, more to come.

New Business

1. An email from Brother Maillard was read concerning the JROTC award presented by Commander Waters last month. Brother Maillard proposes that we assist next year however because of omplications with the National Quartermaster and the JROTC Commander that the Camp will provide the forms and those two can process the request for the badge and certificate. During discussion Brother Paul Davis will recommend the Department keep some Certificates and badges on hand for this important program.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming:

1. May 21, Saturday, Mt.Hope Cemetery, Lansing "Memorial Day" program at 11am.
2. May 22-24, Coldwater Muster.
3. May 22-30, Greenfield Village Lincoln Train program.
4. May 25, Memorial Day parade Jackson & Concord Camp participation.
5. June 13-14, Dexter Muster.
6. June 20- 21, Turkeyville Muster
7. June 27, Saturday Spring port community program, Brother Griggs for details.
8. June 27-28, Waterloo Soldiers and Blacksmith's event. Camp will have the Ice House and tenting area.
9. July 6, "Under the Oaks" downtown Jackson.
10. July 25, Concord Muster.
11. August 8, Rededication of Loomis Battery cannons in Lansing, capitol grounds.
12. August 29-30 Jackson Muster.
13. September 17, 2015 Thursday, Tipton's Franklin Cemetery "Civil War Monument" program and Tecumseh Library Program. More details as event nears.
14. October 2-3, 2015 Central Region Assoc. of Allied Orders "Annual Conference". Event held at Dundee, Michigan and more details as event nears.

Commander Waters proceeded to close the meeting at 8:10pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, July 13, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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Upcoming Events

May: 2015
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Friday May 1 - Sunday May 3 Springfield, IL

Lincoln Funeral Train.


Sunday May 10, 2 p.m.

Plaque Dedication for Andrew Bee 4th Michigan Cavalry, the first soldier to;
"To lay hands on Jeff Davis."
Presented by the General Benjamin Pritchard Camp No. 20.


Monday May 11, 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Tuesday, May 12, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Civil War Round Table, Meijer Branch Jackson District Library.


Saturday May 16, All Day

4th annual Civil war days at the historic Grosvenor house
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Thursday May 21th; All Day - Eaton Rapids

Living History Paragon School
We will be holding this event at the G.A.R. Memorial Hall and Museum,
& G.A.R. Park in Eaton Rapids.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 22-24

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 25,

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Saturday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Friday May 1 - Sunday May 3 Springfield, IL

Lincoln Funeral Train.


Sunday May 10, 2 p.m.

Plaque Dedication for Andrew Bee 4th Michigan Cavalry, the first soldier to;
"To lay hands on Jeff Davis."
Presented by the General Benjamin Pritchard Camp No. 20.


Monday May 11, 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Tuesday, May 12, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Civil War Round Table, Meijer Branch Jackson District Library.


Saturday May 16, All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Thursday May 21th; All Day - Eaton Rapids

Living History Paragon School
We will be holding this event at the G.A.R. Memorial Hall and Museum,
& G.A.R. Park in Eaton Rapids.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 22-24

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI


Monday May 25,

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Saturday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

June: 2015
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Sunday June 7 Jackson 1 p.m.

Annual Jackson Rose Parade Start at S. Jackson & Greenwood goes to Parkside Middle School


No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Tuesday, June 9, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Civil War Round Table, Meijer Branch Jackson District Library.


Saturday & Sunday June 13 - 14 All day Dexter

Days of the Civil War at Gordon Hall 8341 Island Lake Road, Dexter, Michigan


Saturday - Sunday June 20 - 21, All day Turkeyville

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday June 27, All day

Springport Summer Festival Springport, MI


Saturday June 27, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 28, Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

Sunday June 7, Jackson 1 p.m.

Annual Jackson Rose Parade Start at S. Jackson & Greenwood goto Parkside Middle School


No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Tuesday, April 14, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Civil War Round Table, Meijer Branch Jackson District Library.


Saturday & Sunday June 13 - 14 All day Dexter

Days of the Civil War at Gordon Hall 8341 Island Lake Road, Dexter, Michigan


Saturday - Sunday June 20 - 21, All day Turkeyville

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday June 27, All day

Springport Summer Festival Springport, MI


Saturday 27, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 28, Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

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G.A.R. Encampment Port Huron 1912


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