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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


May, 2014


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
The Story of Sidney Barber
Reunion, 9th MI Co. D
Rankin's Lancers
The Camp Cook
May 1864
Tobacciana
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Gentlemen

For those who were unable to attend, we had a guest speaker for our May Meeting. Jim Jackson spoke Co K of the first Michigan Sharpshooters after that we had a very short meeting. Thank you Jim for sharing you knowledge with us.

We have many event's coming up this weekend and I hope you will be able to attending some of them and help us in remembering the Boys in Blue. Memorial Day is their day and we should take every opportunity that we have to honor them who sacrifice so much for us. There are events taking place in Lansing on Saturday at two different places, Mr. Hope and Evergreen Cemeteries. On Sunday there will be a Historical Walking Tour in Eaton Rapids, and of course on Monday there are many different parade going on. I hope to see many of you at these events.

Also we are starting to do our school Civil War Days. Members of our Camp and Auxiliary will be at the Paragon Academy on Tuesday and coming up in June we will be at Parma Elementary School Again I hope many of you will be able to attend and assist with these events.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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~ May 1864 ~
Submitted by Ron Tyrl

Private William Henry Christman of the 67th Pennsylvania Infantry was the first serviceman interred at Arlington in May 13, 1864.

Sickness, shortage of horses & other problems reduced Joe Johnston’s cavalry of 10,000 to an estimated 2,392 effectives in May 1864.

One of the casualties at Resaca, Georgia:
Timothy Danihy, 19 years old, 19th Michigan Infantry Regiment, Company A, enlisted September 9, 1862 at Dowagiac, Cass County. He is wounded in action at Resaca, Georgia and will die from his wound and he was buried at the Chattanooga National Cemetery.
The Battle of Resaca was part of the Atlanta Campaign. The battle was waged in both Gordon and Whitfield counties, Georgia, from May 13–15, 1864. It ended inconclusively with the Confederate Army retreating. The engagement was fought between the Military Division of Mississippi (led by Major General William T. Sherman) and the Army of Tennessee (General Joseph E. Johnston).

May 15, 1864:
In mid-May about daylight Major Downing succeeded in surprising the Cheyenne village of Cedar Bluffs, in a small canon about 60 miles north of the South Platte river. “We commenced shooting. I ordered the men to commence killing them. They lost, as I am informed, some 26 killed and 30 wounded. My own loss was one killed and one wounded. I burnt up their lodges and everything I could get hold of. I took no prisoners. We got out of ammunition and could not pursue them."

May 17, 1864:
The 9th Battery lose three men killed “bushwacked” at Yellow Bayou, Louisiana.

May 19, 1864:
The last engagement in a series of battles of Spotsylvania was fought. Following the American Civil War Battle of Spotsylvania in 1864, General Ulysses S. Grant said, "The world has never seen so bloody and so protracted a battle as the one being fought and I hope never will again."

May 20, 1864:
Spotsylvania-campaign ended after 10,920 were killed or injured person.

May 24-25, 1864
North Anna entrenched position and Battle of New Hope Church in the Atlanta Campaign.

May 1864:
At the end of this May 1864, many in the North were wondering, “Is the suffering and death worth the cause?” President Lincoln found time to write. To Mrs. Abner Bartlett of Medford, Massachusetts, an 86 year old Revolutionary War soldier’s widow:
Dear Mrs. Abner Bartlett,
I thank you for the knitted pair of socks. May God give you many happy days.

A. Lincoln

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Pictures of Sidney Barbers Headstones.

Sidney Barber - One of the saddest cases in the history of Michigan in the Civil War
Submitted to us by Chris Czopek Camp No. 17

From: ALBION RECORDER March 7, 1891 Front Page

The Evening News says Sidney Barber, formerly of Pulaski, Jackson county, now of the Kalamazoo asylum for the insane, has just drawn more money than any other private soldier in Michigan, if not in the United States. He left his home when he was 16, as a member of Co. F, First Michigan sharpshooters. Six months after he was taken prisoner and sent to Salsbury, S.C., prison. He was exchanged from that place in less than five months, and went to his regiment; but the strain on his constitution had been too great, and his mental condition was such that he was at once sent home on a furlough. His body, which was reduced to a mere skeleton from starvation in the prison, soon regained natural flesh, but his mind did not long remain unclouded, and in a very few months after he had rejoined his regiment he was discharged at York, Pa., and sent to the hospital as insane.

The July following he came home to Pulaski, but was at once sent to Kalamazoo, where he has remained ever since, Pension Agent E.D. Knowles took the case to try to get a pension, but the case was rejected the first time. After about one year he tried again, and yesterday he received notice that the back pension had been allowed at $16,000 with a regular monthly allowance of $72.

The only relatives the poor man has are a brother and sister, who reside in Jonesville township. A letter from the staff at the Kalamazoo asylum declares Barber to be in a profoundly demented condition, and that means there is no hope for him of his recovery. All the good his huge fortune will ever be for him is to provide him with food and clothing until time rings the curtain down upon his life's tragedy. He is 49 years old, healthy, physically, and never says anything to any one. His is one of the saddest cases in the history of Michigan in the war.

Sidney Barber died Nov. 24, 1903.
Buried in Buck Cemetery on Wooden road, near Hanover in Jackson Co.

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Cigarette/Cigar Cards and Labels

After the Civil War many companies rushed to cash in on the cerlebity status of some of the major players. One of those was the tobacco industry. Below you will find photos of a couple of such items. If you click on the picture you will be taken to the WikipidiA page for that person.

Nathaniel P Banks - USA

John B. Hood - CSA

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~ Rankin's Lancers ~


From the December 21, 1861 Harper's Weekly

COLONEL RANKIN'S LANCERS.

WE publish on page 805 an illustration of COLONEL RANKIN'S REGIMENT OF LANCERS, now in quarters at Detroit, Michigan, from a sketch kindly sent us by Mr. B. R. Erman. This is the regiment about which the Canadian authorities have made such a noise, and on account of which Colonel Rankin has been dismissed from the Canadian militia. It is to be 1600 strong, armed and equipped like the 16th Regiment of British Lancers. The principal weapon used will be the lance, whose haft will be 15 feet long, and the blade 11 inches. It is held upright when marching, the end resting on a portion of the stirrup. In charging, it is thrust forward so as to project considerably beyond the horse's head, the haft being attached to the rider's arm by a strong cord. In addition to the lance, each man will be provided with sabre rifle, and pistol. The lance is known as "la reine des armes blanches," and well-drilled regiments of lancers have always been deemed very formidable in the field. It is understood that Colonel Rankin's Regiment will be incorporated into the Regular army, and will be retained in service after the war. It is to take the field during the present month.

The French Lancers have always been considered the flower of their cavalry. The men are the tallest and finest in the service, the horses equal to those of the famous cuirassiers. It is understood that General McClellan, during his tour of inspection in Europe, was much impressed with the value of lancers as an adjunct to other cavalry, and recommended the adoption of the weapon by our War Department. Colonel Rankin's regiment is the first-fruit of this opinion; and from all that we hear about it is likely to give a good account of itself, and make the old cavalry regiments look to their fame.

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Camp Cooks

The camp kettles are large sheet-iron pails, one larger than the other so one can be put inside the other when moving. If we have meat and potatoes, meat is put into one and potatoes in the other. The one that gets cooked first is emptied into mess pans, which are large sheet-iron pans with flaring sides, so one can be packed in another. Then the coffee is put in the empty kettle and boiled. The bread is cut into thick slices and the breakfast call sounds. We grab our plates and cups and wait for no second invitation. We each get a piece of meat and a potato, a chunk of bread and a cup of coffee with a spoonful of brown sugar in it. Milk and butter we buy or go without. We save a piece of bread for the last, with which we wipe up everything and then eat the dish rag. Dinner and breakfast are alike, only sometimes the meat and potatoes are cut up and cooked together, which makes a delicious stew. The cooks are men detailed from the ranks for that purpose. I never yet saw the cooks wash their hands but presume they do when they go to the brook for water.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The May 12, 2014 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Bob Griggs, Kyle Hamann, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Roger Manning, Nathan Tingley, Ron Tyrl, and Charlie Waters Jr. Past member: Don Leatherman and guest speaker: Mr. Jim Jackson.
Commander Lloyd opened the meeting by introducing our guest speaker Mr. Jim Jackson who then presented his program on "Company K, First Michigan Sharpshooters."
Commander Lloyd opened the meeting for business: The Ladies' Auxiliary announced that Linda Kronberg was awarded the "Dr. Mary Edwards Walker Award" for outstanding Service to our Order, at the Department Encampment.
The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.
The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed. Treasurer Maillard also reported that he received a 'Thank You" card from the Arthritis Foundation for the donation in memory of Dar Miller.

Graves Registration

1. Brother Waters III is seeking the Camp's contract with Hillcrest Cemetery for Private Pine's Flat Granite Marker that was placed in 2000 and is now covered by sod and needs to be uncovered.
2. Brother Waters also reported there are a couple of headstones that need to be reset at Mt Evergreen and Woodland cemeteries.

Communications

1. The camp received a "Thank You" card from Brother Max Miller for the donation in memory of his wife.
2. The camp received a flier for a ceremony to "Honor the Memory of Lt. Garrett Graveraet and his father" at St. Anne Cemetery, Mackinac Island, June 4, 2014 at 5:45pm.

Old Business

1. Brother's Cox, May 17th, Dedication program this coming weekend.
2. Brother Maillard reported that he will contact the city of Jackson to coordinate the placing of the footing for the Mt Evergreen Soldier's Stone.
3. Brother Van Hoof's dedication program, date TBD.
4. Brother Cox begins his internship at Ella Sharp Museum and will inquire on the GAR Post 48 chairs.

New Business

1. The invitation to the Jackson Area Career Center for their July 10th and 11th "Learning Fair" was applied for.
2. Commander Lloyd requested that the Jackson "Memorial Day Parade" will be the primary Memorial Day participation of the Camp and Concord secondary.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming for the coming year:

1. School programs: Paragon Tuesday May 20, Parma Thursday June 5, with a rain date of the 6th.
2. May 17, this Saturday, Brother Cox's Stone dedication in Stockbridge, Michigan and the Jonesville Grosvenor House Muster.
3. May 18, Sunday, Waterloo "General Custer" program at 1pm in Stockbridge.
4. June, Mt. Evergreen Soldier's Cemetery Plaque & Stone Dedication, Date TBD.
5. May 25, Sunday, Eaton Rapids GAR Hall "History on Foot Walking Tour". There will be two tours, the 1st at 1 p.m., the 2nd at 3 p.m.
6. May 26, Memorial Day, Jackson & Concord.
7. June 14-15, Sat-Sun, Turkeyville Muster.
8. June 21, Saturday, Springport Fest.
9. June 22, Sunday, Brenda Walters "Home Dedication".
10. June 28-29, Sat-Sun, Waterloo Farm Museum's Civil War and Log Cabin Days.
11. Mr. Bruce Martin, "Under the Oaks" representative invited the camp to their program Sunday, July 6th.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:50pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, July14, 2014, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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"VIEW FROM THE FRONT PORCH"
By Jeanne Losey

Confederate soldiers marching through Frederick Maryland 1862.

Miss Fanny sat on her front porch
And watched the troops go by.
A touch of pride was in her heart;
A tear was in her eye.

The uniforms were fresh and new.
No fear was in their hearts.
The heavier artillery
Was carried on the carts.

The horses' manes were braided, and
The guns were polished, too.
These soldiers thought they were prepared
To face the boys in blue.

The drummer beat a lively tune;
The Rebel flag was high.
This was their first encounter, but
So many soon would die.

They laughted and sang and briskly marched.
Some gave the Rebel yell.
They thought the battle wold be fun.
They'd learn that it was Hell.

Miss Fanny sits on her front porch.
It's six weeks later now.
She see the troops go marching by,
But they have changed somehow.

The uniforms are dirtier;
They're ragged, bloody, torn.
The men look hungry and morose.
They're weary and forlorn.

There's less than half returning from
A battle that they lost.
And, in their haunted, tortured eyes,
She saw how high the cost.

These men, who were so young last month,
Have now aged twenty years.
They've seen men wounded, seen men killed,
Screams ring now in their ears.

Miss Fanny sat on her front porch.
She shook her head and sighed.
So many dreams have gone astray.
So many men have died.

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Upcoming Events

May: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.

Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic Grosvenor house
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Tuesday May 21st; All Day - Jackson

Living History Paragon School


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson Parade starting at 10:00 am.

Friday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.


Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Tuesday May 21st; All Day - Jackson

Living History Paragon School


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson Parade starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

June: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Sunday June 1st; Jackson 1 p.m.

Annual Jackson Rose Parade Start at S. Jackson & Greenwood goto Parkside Middle School


Thursday June 5th; All Day - Parma

Living History Parma Elementary School
Rain day Friday the 6th


No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Saturday & Sunday June 7 - 8 Dexter

Days of the Civil War at Gordon Hall 8341 Island Lake Road, Dexter, Michigan


Saturday - Sunday June 14 - 15

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday June 21st All day

Springport Summer Festival Springport, MI


Sunday June 22nd Concord 2 p.m.

Historic Home Dedication Concord, MI


Saturday 28th 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 29th Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

Sunday June 1st Jackson 1 p.m.

Annual Jackson Rose Parade Start at S. Jackson & Greenwood goto Parkside Middle School


Thursday June 5th; All Day - Parma

Living History Parma Elementary School
Rain day Friday the 6th


No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Saturday & Sunday June 7 - 8 Dexter

Days of the Civil War at Gordon Hall 8341 Island Lake Road, Dexter, Michigan


Saturday - Sunday June 14 - 15

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday June 21st All day

Springport Summer Festival Springport, MI


Sunday June 22nd Concord 2 p.m.

Historic Home Dedication Concord, MI


Saturday 28th 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 29th Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 13493 Waterloo-Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

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The USS Onondaga a 2 turet Monitor.

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Ribbons of Company D., 9th Michigan reunions.


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