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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


May, 2013


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Surrender at Appomattox
Events in May
Sugeron at Work
Lieutenant Colonel William McCullough
North vs South
Spotsylvania
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
The Wilderness


When General Sherman left Atlanta for Savannah he had with him;
    60,000 soldiers

    25,000 horses

    2,500 wagons

    600 ambulances

It's a good thing he decided to travel light.


Commanders Column


Brothers of Camp No. 7

I feel we had a very good meeting in April and we got a lot done. As you know May is just around the corner and is going to be a busy month. We have at least seven events on our calendar that we have members committed to attending so be sure to check the bulletin board for days and times to see if you can help those out who are going to be at these events.

Also, our three newest members are scheduled to be at our May meeting for their installation. If you able to attend please do, so you can help welcome them into our Brotherhood.

Lastly I would again like to thank Past Commander in Chief, Keith Harrison for attending out April meeting and assisting our Camp with ceremonial and ritual training.

In F. L. C.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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~ Lieutenant Colonel William McCullough ~

Fourth Illinois Cavalry
Submitted by Ron Tyrl

President Abraham Lincoln wrote this touching letter of condolence to the daughter of his long-time friend, William McCullough. During Lincoln's law circuit days, McCullough was sheriff and clerk of the McLean County Circuit Court in Bloomington, Illinois. Early in the Civil War he helped organize the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, which he served as Lieutenant Colonel. On December 5, 1862, he was killed during a night charge near Coffeeville, Mississippi.

Executive Mansion,
Washington, December 23, 1862.

Dear Fanny
It is with deep grief that I learn of the death of your kind and brave Father; and, especially, that it is affecting your young heart beyond what is common in such cases. In this sad world of ours, sorrow comes to all; and, to the young, it comes with bitterest agony, because it takes them unawares. The older have learned to ever expect it. I am anxious to afford some alleviation of your present distress. Perfect relief is not possible, except with time.

You can not now realize that you will ever feel better. Is not this so? And yet it is a mistake. You are sure to be happy again. To know this, which is certainly true, will make you some less miserable now. I have had experience enough to know what I say; and you need only to believe it, to feel better at once. The memory of your dear Father, instead of an agony, will yet be a sad sweet feeling in your heart of a purer and holier sort than you have known before. Please present my kind regards to your afflicted mother.

Your sincere friend
A. Lincoln

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Surrender at Appomattox

On April 9, 1865, at Appomattox, Virginia, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. Forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed constantly by Union cavalry, Lee had no other option. In retreating from the Union army's Appomattox Campaign, the Army of Northern Virginia had stumbled through the Virginia countryside stripped of food and supplies. At one point, Union cavalry forces under General Philip Sheridan had actually outrun Lee's army, blocking their retreat and taking 6,000 prisoners at Sayler's Creek. Desertions were mounting daily, and by April 8 the Confederates were surrounded with no possibility of escape. On April 9, Lee sent a message to Grant announcing his willingness to surrender. The two generals met in the parlor of the Wilmer McLean home at one o'clock in the afternoon. Lee and Grant, both holding the highest rank in their respective armies, had known each other slightly during the Mexican War and exchanged awkward personal inquiries. Characteristically, Grant arrived in his muddy field uniform while Lee had turned out in full dress attire, complete with sash and sword. Lee asked for the terms, and Grant hurriedly wrote them out. All officers and men were to be pardoned, and they would be sent home with their private property--most important, the horses, which could be used for a late spring planting. Officers would keep their side arms, and Lee's starving men would be given Union rations. Shushing a band that had begun to play in celebration, General Grant told his officers, "The war is over. The Rebels are our countrymen again." Although scattered resistance continued for several weeks, for all practical purposes the Civil War had come to an end

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NORTH ~ VS ~ SOUTH
The start of 1865 was a very dark time for the people living in the South. There were many living here though who still thought they could win the war. Looking back now almost 150 years later we can see how delusional that thinking was.

Southern armies were deserting in very large numbers, Sam Watkins said trying to stop them was "like trying to stop the current of the Duck River with a fish net." The price of gold in the south rose to 5000 and a confederate dollar was worth less than 2% of its 1861 value. The head of the Confederate War Bureau stated "...ten days ago the last meat ration was issued [to Lee's army] and not a pound remains in Richmond..." Although the south did have cotton and food, it did not the manufacturing to make cloths or blankets or the means of transportation to get these items to where they were needed. The North had as many manufacturing plants as the South had manufacturing workers. The rail system was so bad in the South that when President Jefferson Davis left Jackson, Mississippi to travel to Montgomery Alabama, the south's first capital, he had to travel 750 miles to get to his destination 250 miles away. By the last months of the war because of raids and the inability to repair them, southern railroads had become mostly useless. Some industries did start up during the war. Gunpowder mills, ordnance plants, machine shops opened in Augusta, Selma, Atlanta along with many other places but Union invasion and raids destroyed most of these along with anything else of value in the area.

The war had not only killed off one quarter of the white males of military age but two-fifths of the livestock. One half of the farm machinery and thousands of miles of railroad were also destroyed. Added to all of this is that the principal labor system that southern productivity was based was also taken away from them as well.

The census of 1870 showed that agriculture and manufacturing capital declined by 46 percent in the south since 1860 while the north showed a 50 percent increase. In 1860 the south held 30 percent of the nations wealth, in 1870 that number had dropped to 12 percent. In 1860 a Southerners income (including slaves) was equal to about two thirds of a person in the north. By 1870 that number had dropped to about two fifths.

Although the south was in great decline the north was showing unprecedented growth. With 671 warships the U.S. Navy was the largest in the world, and though about 300,000 men had died they still had a million men in uniform better trained and equipped that ever. Coal and iron production in the North by 1864 was 29 percent higher than anytime in history for the whole nation. The north built more ship tonnage during the war than the whole nation had built in any 4 years of peacetime production period. Traffic over Northern railroads and in the Erie Canal both increased by 50 percent. Despite a 72 percent drop in the cotton textile industry, the manufacturing index was up 13 percent. Despite the fact that there were half a million farmers in the Union army, the North produced more wheat in both 1862 and 1863 than the entire country had in the previous high year of production in 1859. Not only did they produce enough food to feed the army and its population but they doubled the amount exported of wheat, corn, pork and beef.

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Surgeon at Work

George Alfred Townsend Harpers correspondent


Surgeon at Work from Harpers Weekely

SPACE

I rode across the fields to the Hogan, Curtis and Gaines mansions, for some of the wounded had been deposited in each of them. All the cow-houses, wagon-sheds, hay-barracks, hen-coops, Negro cabins and barns were turned into hospitals. The floors were littered with "corn-chucks" and fodder, and the maimed, gashed, and dying lay confusedly together. A few, slightly wounded, stood at windows, relating incidents of the battle, but at the doors sentries stood with crossed bayonets, to keep out idlers and gossips. The mention of my vocation was an "open sesame," and I went unrestrained, into all the largest hospitals. In the first of them an amputation was being performed, and at the door lay a little heap of human fingers, feet, legs, and arms. I shall not soon forget the bare-armed surgeons, with bloody instruments, that leaned over the rigid and insensible figure, while the comrades of the subject looked horrifiedly at the scene.

The grating of the murderous saw drove me into the open air, but in the second hospital which I visited, a wounded man had just expired, and I encountered his body at the threshold. Within, a sickening smell of mortality was almost insupportable, but by degrees I became accustomed to it. The lanterns hanging around the room streamed fitfully upon the red eyes, the half-naked figures. All were looking up, and saying, in pleading monotone: "Is that you doctor?" Men with their arms in slings went restlessly up and down, smarting with fever. Those who were wounded in the lower extremities, body, or head, lay upon their back, tossing even in sleep. They listened peevishly to the wind whistling through the chinks of the barn. They followed one with rolling eyes. Soldiers sat by the severely wounded, laying their sores with water. In many wounds the ball still reminded, and the discolored flesh was swollen unnaturally. There were some who had been shot in the bowels, and now and then they were frightfully convulsed, breaking into shrieks and shouts. The act of calling seemed to dull the pain. Many were unconscious and lethargic, moving their fingers and lips mechanically, but never more to open their eyes upon the light; they were already going through the valley and the shadow.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The April 8, 2013 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Henry Hawker, Mark Heath, Bob Griggs, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Roger Manning Ron Tyrl, Charlie Waters Jr. and Dept. Representative Keith Harrison.

Commander Lloyd thanked Brother Keith Harrison for his assistance to our camp with ceremonial & ritual training and the Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Heath and seconded by Brother Waters, motion passed.

The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Cox, and seconded by Brother Davis, motion passed.
Treasurer Maillard reviewed the paid members for 2013 with a total of 33 members: there were two deaths, five discharges. one dropped and four new members. The one dropped member was for the 2013 dues haven't been paid but the member plans to. Treasurer Maillard motioned to drop the member until dues are paid and seconded by Brother Griggs, motion passed. Treasurer Maillard also received $750 from those donating in memory of Bob Hoffman and Brother Maillard sent Bob's wife a letter acknowledging the 31 donations and 31 thank you letters were sent to the donators also. This money will be a subset of the restoration fund for contribution to a cause Brother Hoffman would have supported.

Patriotic Instructor

Brother Joe Davis reviewed Union Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson raid from LaGrange Tennessee to Baton Rouge in support of Grant's movements against Vicksburg. Brother Davis also had a letter from his relative on his participation in this campaign. Brother Davis reminded everyone to review up-coming events on the Camp's website.

Chaplain's Report

Brother Chris Cox reviewed his attendance at the Gettysburg conference. He also had pictures from the Cemetery & Battlefield portions of the conference. It was noted that Brother Cox was on the C-Span television program on "Battlefield Trauma" during the question portion when he asked a question of the panel on post-war veteran trauma.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs up-dated the 2013 events page with Friday, May 10th Northwest School program, May 18th Jonesville Muster and the May 27th Memorial Day events; June's Turkeyville Muster & Waterloo Farm events & July's Concord Days program.
2. Brother Griggs also up-dated the auxiliary pages, and added the Paragon School program Tuesday, May 21st.

Communications

1. An e-mail was received from Ms. Melissa Johnson from Spring Arbor Manor requesting our Camp's participation in their Veteran's Day program at 3pm.
2. Brother Maillard received an "Always Remembered Never Forgotten" T-Shirts order form which can be personalized at newlifepatriot.

Old Business

1. The Mt. Evergreen Cemetery's wooden "Soldier's Cemetery Sign" replacement by a permanent marker committee was formed with Brothers: Hawker, Heath and Maillard serving. 2014 projected date for completion.
2. Brother Brad Funkhouser family members are planning on their initiation at the May Camp Meeting.
3. The Medal of Honor John Kelly stone finalized by the Medal of Honor Society.
4. The May 4th Department Encampment credentials were handed out to those planning on attending. Reminder: Brother Griggs is applying for a Department council position. Auxiliary President Linda Kronberg announced that a live auction will be done at the Encampment for a parlor lamp, money to go to "Save the Flags" and advertisements are for purchase in the Encampment program book; money going to the committee to bring the National Encampment to Michigan.

For the Good of the Order

1. Programs planned for the coming year:
    a. April 14, Sunday, Lincoln Tomb Springfield, Illinois.
    b. May 10, Friday, Northwest School Program.
    c. May 21, Tuesday Paragon School Program.
    d. May 24-26, Coldwater Muster.
    e. May 27, Memorial Day: Jackson 9:30am; Concord 10am; Spring Arbor 3pm.
    f. June 2, Sunday, Rose Parade.     g. June 8, Saturday, Col. Jeffords burial, Dexter 10am.
    h. July 8, Monday, Camp meeting, Jim Jackson from Camp 22, will present a program on the "Iron Brigade".
Department Brother Harrison reviewed the Detroit Veteran Day & GAR Hall rededication plans in November. He also emphasizes listing events the Camp is doing on the Sesquicentennial Calendar Events List webpage because all these events are being forwarded to the Library of Congress as a commemorative of Michigan's 150th Civil War participation.
Brother Harrison also summarized the GAR Hall status in Eaton Rapid, currently the 501 tax exemption is being applied for and a board of directors is being formed for the establishment of the "GAR Memorial Hall & Museum of Michigan".

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:00pm and Harrison went over Ceremonies & rituals, our next camp meeting is scheduled for May 13, 2013, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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Battle of Spotsylvania (or the 19th century spelling Spottsylvania),

SPACE

"I propose to fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer." This was the message General Grant sent to President Lincoln May 11, 1864. The next morning he launched Hancock's 2nd Corps against Confederate works at what was known as the Mule Shoe at Spotsylvania (or the 19th century spelling Spottsylvania), Hancock's men took the first line of trenches but a counter attack was made before they could reach others and they were driven back to the first line.

For the next 18 hours some of the wars worse fighting took place here along a few hundred yards of earthworks. Men on both sides shot, or tried to bayonet each other through the logs that made up the works. Many times both Federal and Rebel flag were flying at the same time over the same works as neither side could seem to get the upper hand. The firing was so heavy that a tree that was almost 2 feet thick was cut down by fired minie balls, as the dead and dying were trampled into the mud by the living.

Finally a relative quiet settled over the battlefield and the exhausted Confederates fell back to their new lines ½ mile away leaving only corpses at the Bloody Angle. When a Union burial detail arrived they found in one section of the trench that measured about 200 square feet, 150 dead rebels who had fallen and been trampled down on top of each other in the fighting. They were buried by pushing the parapet over on top of them.

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Army Grub
By Jeanne Losey

Soldiers enjoying (?) hardtack

There is one difference between these crackers and a kind of fish I have seen, called sheepshead. The difference is, the fish can float, and the crackers cannot. The more you boiled the fish the trougher he got, and it's diddo with the crackers."

A Wisconsin Soldier

One thing about the Army that
I never will forget.
That hardtack is the dangest stuff
A soldier ever et.

It's awful wearing' on the jaws;
a real tooth-duller too,
And it's dang neart impossible
Fer anyone to chew.

We kept it with us all the time.
It never did get stale,
Although, at times yore appetite
Would often start to fail.

We called them things "worm castles," and
I swear that this is true;
You hardly ever ate hardtack
Without a worm or two.

That's how we got our vitamins
And proteins every day.
They're tasty little morsels, folks,
No matter that you say.

I don't suggest you try ‘em, but
I will admit that I
Have et enough of them to last
Until the day I die.

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Upcoming Events


May: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday May 4th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.


Monday May 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Date to be announced

Cleaning Veterans headstones
Mt. Evergreen Cemetery Jackson MI.


Monday May 27th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Saturday May 4th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.


Monday May 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Date to be announced

Cleaning Veterans headstones
Mt. Evergreen Cemetery Jackson MI.


Monday May 27th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

June: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Saturday June 8th 10 a.m. Dexter

Col. Jeffords burial


Saturday - Sunday June 15 - 16

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday 22nd 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 23rd Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 9998 Waterloo Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

No regular meeting is scheduled for June.


Saturday June 8th 10 a.m. Dexter

Col. Jeffords burial


Saturday - Sunday June 15 - 16

The Battle of Turkeyville. Turkeyville, MI


Saturday 22nd 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Sunday 23rd Noon - 4 p.m. Waterloo

Waterloo Farm Museum Blacksmith, Soldiers and Log Cabin Weekend. Waterloo Farm Museum 9998 Waterloo Munith Rd., Waterloo Michigan

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Unburied dead from the Battle of the Wilderness

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Other Events in May

Battle of Chancellorsville May 2, 1863

Battle of Champion Hill May 16, 1863

Battle of Big Black River (Bridge) May 17, 1863

Battle of Vicksburg May 18 - July 4, 1863

Battle of the Wilderness May 5 - 7, 1984

Battle of Spotsylvania (or the 19th century spelling Spottsylvania May 8 - 21, 1864
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