Camp Courier Header

"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


April, 2014


.

.

In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Our Camp turns 100
G.A.R. Encampments Boston & Detriot
Chicago contributes
Spying in the Civil War
Looking for a furlough
Tobacciana
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Gentlemen of Austin Blair Camp 7

For our April meeting, I feel we had one of the best ones we've had since I became Commander. I wish to thank all of you that attended as well as the past members who were in attendance. It was great see all of you again. I'm still not quite sure who that tall lanky Sargent was though. Something about him looked familiar but the uniform just seemed all wrong.

As you all know we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Austin Blair Camp with a party. Along with our members, past and present, we had many visitors to help us in our celebration. Past Commanders in Chief; past Department Commanders, Jim Pahl and Keith Harrison the present department Commander Paul Davis, and Senior Vice Commander Dale Aurand, as well as two State Representatives Earl Poleski and Mike Shirkey. If that wasn't enough, we also had a guess speaker, William Anderson, who spoke on coinage and stamps in Civil War. It was very interesting talk. The Auxiliary server cake. cheese and crackers, fruit, dip, Jello cups, pop and water. Thank you Ladies for your time and efforts in helping us celebrate.

The two Representatives presented the camp with Special Tribute certificate for 100 years of helping to "Keep Green the Memory", and department Commander Davis presented a Letter of Recognition to the camp congratulating us on 100 years..

The next two months we are going to be busy with all of our upcoming events. Going to different school to give talks and show them how a Civil War Soldier lived, as well as headstone dedications, and Memorial Day. Sounds like it's time to dust off the ole uniform and get back to work gents.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

Return to the top of the page.


~ Looking for a furlough ~

Letter Home

"Dear Wife,

I received your letter dated March 3 (1863) on last Tuesday, but I did not answer it immediately as I thought perhaps, I could get the privilege to go home on a furlough as I had the promise that if there was any one go out of our company went I should go first. But I may still have little hope yet to come and see you as there is talk of granting more furlough, and I will try my best to come and see you and the children.

"There would be no difficulty to get a furlough was it not for those rascals who when they are trusted to go home break their oath and stay at home, thus depriving honest men from seeing their families. If I should happen to get a furlough, I would join my company, on its expirations, if I was but able to be carried to it.

"Bill (?) and the other man is not in our company but belong to Company G (?) in our regiment, but they are not here and have not been with their regiment these seven months. They are great soldiers if they do all their fighting from home I suppose.

"I am sorry that Sammy is no better, and I am anxious to hear how he is getting along. I am very anxious to see him. I am glad the rest of you keep so well. I am enjoying good health.

"John and Frank Reed got their boxes and they was in pretty good order. I had the pleasure of eating some of their contents but it is no use sending one anything, it would spoil before I got it. The two Reed boys are well and all the other Shamokin boys. Frank and John sends you their respects. I received a letter from my mother on the 7th (?) and she and all the rest was well. We are just beginning to see and feel our winter (?) as it is very cold today and it was snowing pretty fast this morning. We have rain or snow every day and night. We had thunder here the other night.

I will now close by sending you my love. Remember me to all the children hoping I be with you soon.

I remain your loving husband,

Jacob Crist

Write soon, direct as before."

He'd never return
Crist would be among the first to fall at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, and is buried in the national cemetery there.
He, like the more than 7,500 other men on both sides who fought and died there during those three days of combat, never saw his family again.

Return to the top of the page.



Members, past and present who celebrated our 100 anniversary.

On April 21, 1914 the Austin Blair Camp No. 7 S.U.V.C.W. was formed and has been providing services educating people, and Keeping Green the Memory" in the Jackson area for the past 100 years. Congratulations to all members past and present of the Austin Blair Camp and the Ladies Auxiliary.

Return to the top of the page.


Cigarette/Cigar Cards and Labels

After the Civil War many companies rushed to cash in on the cerlebity status of some of the major players. One of those was the tobacco industry. Below you will find photos of a couple of such items. If you click on the picture you will be taken to the WikipidiA page for that person.

Don Carlos Buell - USA

John B. Magruder - CSA

Return to the top of the page.


.


~ Did you know ~
Submitted by PCC Ron Tyrl


The city of Chicago sent over 28,000 men in the service to the Union during the Civil War from a city of 156,000. That's 18% of the total population.

Factoring a third of the total population were men, a third women and a third children, that results in a total male population of 52,480. Using this male population number over 55% of all the men in Chicago served to save the Union.

Return to the top of the page.



Spying in the Civil War
From History.com

Though neither the Union nor the Confederacy had a formal military intelligence network during the Civil War, each side obtained crucial information from spying or espionage operations. From early in the war, the Confederacy set up a spy network in the federal capital of Washington, D.C., home to many southern sympathizers. The Confederate Signal Corps also included a covert intelligence agency known as the Secret Service Bureau, which managed spying operations along the so-called "Secret Line" from Washington to Richmond. As the Union had no centralized military intelligence agency, individual generals took charge of intelligence gathering for their own operations. General George B. McClellan hired the prominent Chicago detective Allan Pinkerton to set up the first Union espionage organization in mid-1861.

Confederate Spies in Washington

Located 60 miles south of the Mason-Dixon Line, Washington, D.C. was full of southern sympathizers when the Civil War broke out in 1861. Virginia's Governor John Letcher, a former congressman, used his knowledge of the city to set up a nascent spy network in the capital in late April 1861, after his state seceded but before it officially joined the Confederacy. Two of the most prominent early recruits were Thomas Jordan, a West Point graduate stationed in Washington before the war, and Rose O'Neal Greenhow, an openly pro-South widow and socialite who was friendly with a number of northern politicians, including Secretary of State William Seward and Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson.

In July 1861, Greenhow sent coded reports across the Potomac to Jordan (now a volunteer in the Virginia militia) concerning the planned Federal invasion. One of her couriers, a young woman named Bettie Duvall, dressed as a farm girl in order to pass Union sentinels on the Chain Bridge leaving Washington, then rode at high speed to Fairfax Courthouse in Virginia to deliver her message to Confederate officers stationed there. Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard later credited the information received from Greenhow with helping his rebel army win a surprise victory in the First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas) on July 21.

Confederate Signal Corps and Secret Service Bureau

The Confederate Signal Corps, which operated the semaphore system used for communicating vital information between armies on the field, also set up a covert intelligence operation known as the Secret Service Bureau. Headed by William Norris, the former Baltimore lawyer who also served as chief signal officer for the Confederacy, the bureau managed the so-called "Secret Line," an ever-changing system of couriers used to get information from Washington across the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers to Confederate officials in Richmond. The Secret Service Bureau also handled the passing of coded messages from Richmond to Confederate agents in the North, Canada and Europe.

A number of Confederate soldiers, especially cavalrymen, also acted as spies or "scouts" for the rebel cause. Among the most famous were John Singleton Mosby, known as the "Gray Ghost," who led guerrilla warfare in western Virginia through the latter years of the war, and especially J.E.B. Stuart, the celebrated cavalry officer whom General Robert E. Lee called "the eyes of the army."

Union Spies: Allan Pinkerton's Secret Service

Allan Pinkerton, the founder of his own detective agency in Chicago, had collected intelligence for Union General George B. McClellan during the first months of the Civil War, while McClellan led the Department of Ohio. When President Abraham Lincoln summoned McClellan to Washington late that summer, the general put the detective in charge for intelligence for his Army of the Potomac, and Pinkerton set up the first Union espionage operation in mid-1861. Calling himself E.J. Allen, Pinkerton built a counterintelligence network in Washington and sent undercover agents to ingratiate themselves in the Confederate capital of Richmond. Unfortunately, Pinkerton's intelligence reports from the field during 1862's Peninsula Campaign consistently miscalculated Confederate numbers at twice or three times their actual strength, fueling McClellan's repeated calls for reinforcements and reluctance to act.

Though he called his operation the U.S. Secret Service, Pinkerton actually worked only for McClellan. Union military intelligence was still decentralized at the time, as generals (and even President Lincoln) employed their own agents to seek out information and report back to them. Another prominent Union intelligence officer was Lafayette C. Baker, who worked for the former Union General in Chief Winfield Scott and later for Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. The brave but ruthless Baker was notorious for rounding up Washingtonians suspected of having southern sympathies; he later directed the manhunt for John Wilkes Booth, the actor and Confederate sympathizer who shot and killed Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in April 1865. Prominent Civil War Spies

Thanks to her success, Rose O'Neal Greenhow was one of the first Confederate spies targeted by Allan Pinkerton. Shortly after the southern victory in the First Battle of Bull Run, Pinkerton put Greenhow under surveillance and subsequently arrested her. Imprisoned in the Old Capitol Prison, she was released in June 1862 and sent to Richmond. Belle Boyd, another famous southern belle-turned-Confederate spy, helped smuggle intelligence to General Stonewall Jackson during his Shenandoah Valley campaign in 1862. Like the Confederacy, the Union also made use of female spies: Richmond's Elizabeth Van Lew, known as "Crazy Bett," risked her life running an espionage operation out of her family's farm, while Sarah Emma Edmonds disguised herself as a black slave to enter Confederate camps in Virginia.

The British-born Timothy Webster, a former police officer in New York City, became the Civil War's first double agent. Sent by Pinkerton to Richmond, Webster pretended to be a courier on the Secret Line, and managed to gain the trust of Judah P. Benjamin, the Confederate secretary of war (later secretary of state). Benjamin sent Webster to deliver documents to secessionists in Baltimore, which Webster promptly passed on to Pinkerton and his staff. Webster was eventually arrested, tried as a spy, and sentenced to death. Though Lincoln sent President Jefferson Davis a message threatening to hang captured Confederate spies if Webster were executed, the death sentence was carried out in late April 1862.

Return to the top of the page.


Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The April 14, 2014 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Ed Conklin, Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Kyle Hamann, Henry Hawker, Mark Heath, Kim Horning, Dave Kimble, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Roger Manning, Max Miller, Daniel Pardee, Nathan Tingley, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof and Charlie Waters Jr and Waters III. Past members: Landon Hawker, Bill Lowe, John Mann and Mark Weiss. Department Representatives: Dept. Commander Paul Davis, SVC Dale Aurand, PDCs: Keith Harrison and Jim Paul. Michigan Legislators: Mr. Earl Poleski and Mr. Mike Shirkey and guest speaker: Bill Anderson.

Commander Lloyd opened the meeting by welcoming everyone to the Camp's Hundredth Anniversary meeting after a group photograph was taken and introduced our guest speaker Mr. Bill Anderson who then presented his program on "Commerce during the U.S. Civil War in Jackson, County Michigan." Commander Lloyd presented Mr. Anderson with a U.S. Flag to show the camp's appreciation for presenting his program to the camp.

Michigan legislators Mr. Poleski and Mr. Shirkey presented Commander Lloyd with a certificate of recognition of our Camp's 100th anniversary and Dept. Commander Paul Davis also presented a certificate of recognition on the Camp's anniversary.

Commander Lloyd opened the meeting for business: The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Kimble and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed. The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.
Treasurer Maillard also reported that he has the 100th anniversary badges for purchase and the IRS tax exemption form 990 has been processed.

Patriotic Instructor

Brother Davis summarized two 1914 charter members, Dean and Thayne LaBanta's participation in the Camp during their tenure.
Brother Davis also summarized Brother Dean LaBanta's service in the Marine Corps during World War I. Brother Dean LaBanta fought in every major battle in France and was killed in action one week before the end of the war.
Brother Van Hoof also summarized the Marine Corps actions in France during World War One.

Graves Registration

1. Medal of Honor John Kelly's stone progress is with the Veterans Administration reviewing the paperwork; hopefully to be completed soon but the dedication of the Medal of Honor stone will be pushed back.
2. Brother Waters III continues researching and providing information for and from the database. And Brother Waters had a rubbing from Dean LaBanta's headstone for all the camp to view.
3. Brother Waters also reported that the VA will be more lenient on the ordering of military headstones but will still prefer family members of the soldier applying for the stones.

Communications

1. The camp received "Thank You" cards from Peggy Horn for the camp's sympathy card on the loss of Everett and John and Brother Dave Gilman also sent a card for the camp's wishing him well.
2. Brother Max Miller also thanked the camp for their donation in memory of his wife who passed away this month.

Old Business

1. Brother's Cox, May 17th & Van Hoof's, date TBD, Veteran Stone Dedications.
2. Brother Maillard picked up a locker that Consumers Power donated to the camp and was placed in post 29 for the Camp's Historian's items for storage.

New Business

1. Brother Cox agreed to inquire if the GAR Post 48 chairs at the Ella Sharp Museum could be transferred or loaned to the Eaton Rapid's GAR Museum; since Brother Cox will be interning at the Museum.
2. The Department Encampment reminder was announced for May 10th in Lansing at the Great Lakes Christian College, and the credential cards were available for those attending.
3. An invitation was received from the Jackson Area Career Center for their July 10th and 11th "Learning Fair".
4. PDC Keith Harrison read a resolution for the Department, to accept the Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Hall and Museum's offer to serve as the department's repository for its Grand Army of the Republic and Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War artifacts and records.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming for the coming year:

1. School programs: Paragon Thursday May 20, Parma Thursday June 5.
2. May 12, Camp meeting, Mr. Jim Jackson will be our guest speaker on Company K, First Michigan Sharpshooters.
3. May 17, Brother Cox's Stone dedication in Stockbridge, Michigan.
4. May 17, The 3rd annual Civil war days at the historic Grosvenor house
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250
5. June, Mt. Evergreen Soldier's Cemetery Plaque & Stone Dedication, Date TBD.
6. May 26, Memorial Day, Jackson & Concord.
7. June 14-15, Sat-Sun, Turkeyville Muster.
8. June 21, Saturday, Springport Fest.
9. June 22, Sunday, Historic home dedication, Concord.
10. June 28-29, Sat-Sun, Waterloo Farm Museum's Civil War and Log Cabin Days.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 9:00pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, May 12, 2014, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Return to the top of the page.


.

.

"THE WOMEN'S ROLE"
By Jeanne Losey
We talk about the men who went
Away to war that day,
But no one seems to think about
The women who must stay.

When men were gone, the women had
To try to take their place,
But no one seems to think about
The hardships they must face.

We talk about the bravery of
The men who go to fight,
Who proudly march off to defend
A cause they think if right.

But what about the women who
Must say goodbye and stay
To keep the home fires burning while
Their men are far away;

Who plow the fields and plant the crops,
And learn to chop the wood,
And do a lot of man-type things
They never understood?

Who tended to the animals,
And who did all the chores
As well as cook and wash the clothes,
Tend kids and mop the floors?

The men faced many hardships as
They did what they must do,
But don't forget the women folk,
For they have suffered too.

Return to the top of the page.



.

Upcoming Events



March: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday March 10th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Monday March 10th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Ladies Auxiliary Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. ( Visitors welcome).

Return to the top of the page.

April: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday April 12th; Springfield IL

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Monday April 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
Guest speaker will be William Anderson talking about Civil War Commerce in Jackson County


Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, Parma Elementary and Williamston. Please check back for dates.
Monday April 14th; 7 p.m.

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
Guest speaker will be William Anderson talking about Civil War Commerce in Jackson County


Saturday April 12th; Springfield IL

Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, Parma Elementary and Williamston. Please check back for dates.

Return to the top of the page.

May: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.

Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic Grosvenor house
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Friday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.


Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Return to the top of the page.

CLICK HERE TO SEE BACK ISSUES



A picture of the Hornet's Nest - Shiloh.

Return to the top of the page.



Brochure from the 1890 Encampment held in Boston.



Return to the top of the page.

.

.

Return to Austin Blair home page.