Camp Courier Header

"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


April, 2013


.

.

In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
Events in April
Regimental Nicknames
Albert Cashier 95th Ill
Families
Jack of the 102 PA Vol
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
The Nation Mourns


Secretary of War Stanton told the President the following story, which greatly amused the latter, as he was especially fond of a joke at the expense of some high military or civil dignitary. It should be remembered that Stanton had little or no sense of humor.

When Secretary Stanton was making a trip up the Broad River in North Carolina, in a tugboat, a Federal picket yelled out, "What have you got on board of that tug?" The severe and dignified answer was, "The Secretary of War and Major-General Foster." Instantly the picket roared back, "We've got Major-Generals enough up here. Why don't you bring us up some hardtack?"


Commanders Column


Brothers And Comrades

I would like to welcome the newest members of our Camp. Robert, Michael, and Nicholas Funkhouser and hope we can meet them all at our next meeting. All three are decedents of Nicholas Krebs (Crapps) who was a private in Company B., 78th Ohio. We look forward to your working with us on upcoming events.

Past Commander in Chief, Keith Harrison will be at our April meeting to review with us ceremonies, and rituals. He will also be going over proper uniform and accouterments to assist our camp's participation in the parades, dedications, and grave side ceremonies, (just to name a few) that we take part in. Be sure to bring your musket, sword and sabers with you to this meeting.

The "School of the Solders" was a success. On behalf of the camp I would like to send along a THANK YOU, to the 7 TH Michigan for putting it on, and for allowing us to attend. I'm sure all of the Brothers who had the chance to do so found it very informative.

In F. L. C.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

Return to the top of the page.


~ Albert D.J. Cashier ~

95th Ill

Albert D.J. Cashier enlisted in the 95th Illinois Infantry in 1862 at the age of 19 and saw much action in the Western theater.

Had it not been for and automobile accident in 1910 he might have gone to his grave without the world knowing that he was really Jennie Hodgers who was born in Ireland and immigrated to the United States as a stowaway.

She was not the only female to hide her gender to enlist and fight as a man (there were about 800 "known" cases of this) but very few were able to keep the secret as long as she did.

The 95th Illinois Infantry was organized at Rockford, Illinois and mustered into Federal service on September 4, 1862. The regiment was mustered out on August 17, 1865 at Galveston, Texas.

The regiment suffered 7 officers and 77 enlisted men who were killed in action or who died of their wounds and 1 officer and 204 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 289 fatalities

During the War the 95th took part in the following Battles:

Battle of Raymond
Battle of Jackson
Battle of Champion's Hill
Battle of Big Black River
Siege of Vicksburg
Battle of Pleasant Hill
Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
Battle of Atlanta
Battle of Jonesboro

Return to the top of the page.


Family

Fincher Brothers 43rd Georiga
Most states regiments were recruited from one area and therefore were bound by community as well as family ties. The 24th Michigan, part of the Iron Brigade, had 135 sets of brothers listed among its ranks. The 15th Wisconsin, a mostly Norwegian regiment had a dozen men named Ole Olson. Their colonel finally brought some order to all the confusion this caused by assigning each of them a number.

To offset the larger number of the northen states many families in the South contributed many of their men to fight. The Bledsoe family of Mississippi sent 10 sons and 5 son-in-laws. Mrs. Enoch Cook watched as her husband, ten sons, and two grandsons left to wear the gray. One company in the Fifth Virginia listed 18 members of the Bell family in its ranks. Six of there were killed in action while five others died of disease. David Barton watched as six sons joined the Stonewall Brigade where two were killed and two were permanently disabled. Three Sexton brothers joined with their cousin, all died in battle or Northern prisons. Four Timberlake brothers enlisted. Three of them were crippled for life. The same number of the Carpenter family served in an artillery battery. Joseph, the oldest, fell in 1862. Command then passed to John who lost n arm in 64. The third brother was left permanently impaired with a bullet in his left lung, and the fourth lost a leg in the closing months of the war.

As noted above not all the men who joined with family members were from the South. David Wescott enlisted with two of his sons, Orlando 22 and 16 year old Philetus. Six months into their term Orlando died of typhoid and David himself was discharged for "age and sickness". He barely made it home in time to die.

Senator John Crittenden had two sons who both became generals; one on each side. William Terrell of Virginia also had two sons become generals on opposite sides of the fighting. One died in battle in 1862, the other was killed in 1864. Legend has it he buried them both in the same grave under a single marker with the epitaph; "Here lie my two sons. Only God knows which one was right.".

Return to the top of the page.


.


Regimental Nicknames.

The 17th New York in Review.

A regiment was suppose to consist of 10 companies of 100 men each, but with deaths, wounds, desertions and discharges, by the middle of the war it was a very lucky colonel who commanded a regiment of 300 men. The regiment that a soldier belonged to was, in most cases, a great source of pride. Most soldiers knew that there was no other unit in either North or South that could match their regiments in marching, fighting or even suffering.

Many regiments held unique ethnic or other characteristics that set them apart, such as the all Irish 69th New York. The Seventh Missouri, know as the "Missouri Irish Brigade" was known for fighting, and they did not care much about who. A Sargent wrote of them "...they arrived here yesterday. It is said that there are 800 men and the first day they came here there were 900 fights...." It was said of one Maine regiment that they could "steal more sheep and honey in a day than we could in a week." The 39th New York, the "Garibaldi Guards" consisted of a half dozen different nationalities. One of their companies mutinied and its colonel went to jail.

Many regiments were given nicknames, not always by their own choice. The 3rd New Jersey Cavalry was known as "The Flying Butterflies" because of their gaudy uniforms. The 14th Iowa was known as the "Temperance Regiment" because all of its members pledge not to; tough, taste, or handle spirts. The 23rd Pennsylvania was called the "Boy Regiment" as most were teenagers. Faculty from the Illinois State Normal College made up most of the officers in the 33rd which carried the "Teacher Regiment" with it throughout the war.

Of course nicknames were not just given in the North. The 26th Alabama was made up from poor farmers who had no uniforms. Each of its members carried patchwork blankets over their shoulders and were known as the "Bed Quilt Regiment".

Probably one of the most embarrassing names given was carried by the 21st Infantry/1st Indiana Heavy Artillery. They entered the war with mules rather than horses to pull their guns and despite a stellar service record they were labeled the "Jackass Regiment".

Some units made their names by the loses they suffered. The First Minnesota lost 85 percent of its men in one day at Gettysburg, the First Texas 82 percent at Antietam. Five Virginia regiments made up the famed "Stonewall Brigade" and about 6,000 men served in those units throughout the war. When Lee surrendered his army at Appomattox Court House only 210 of them were left, none above the rank of captain. Its name, along with each and every name given to other regiments, were carried proudly by these men for the rest of their lives.

Return to the top of the page.

Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The March 11, 2013 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Henry Hawker, Bob Griggs, Ron Lewis, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Ron Tyrl, Dave Van Hoof, and Charlie Waters Jr.

Commander Lloyd welcomed all to the March meeting and the Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Waters and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.
The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented by Brother Griggs, and seconded by Brother Davis, motion passed. Treasurer Maillard reported that the Camp's Income Tax Exemption Form was processed, and the Vicksburg Monument check was cashed but the Waterloo flag pole check has not. A review of the paid members for 2013 was done.

Patriotic Instructor

Brother Joe Davis reminded everyone to review up-coming events on the Camp's website: school programs are coming up and will be included as dates received: Parma Elementary, Paragon, East Jackson Memorial, and Northwest are the schools projected.

Chaplain's Report

Brother Chris Cox will be attending the Gettysburg Conference this coming week on, "The Future of Civil War History: Looking Beyond the 150th"; Brother Cox will bring back to us what he learns. Also Brother Cox reported that he just published his second book: History of Pennsylvania Civil War Regiments: Artillery, Cavalry, Volunteers, Reserve Corps, and U.S. Color Troops. His previous book was, Michigan Civil War Regiment: Artillery, Cavalry, Engineers, Infantry and Sharpshooters, both books can be purchased on-line. Discussion of Pennsylvania Reserve Units was held and all congratulated Brother Cox on his writing career.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs up-dated the 2013 events page and added a new song to that link. Brother Griggs summarized the "School of the Soldier" event he attended along with other Camp members. Brother Griggs also brought some items to the meeting for viewing: two photo albums of "Civil War Theme Cigar Bands and 1860 & 1864 Campaign posters", a couple of unique colorized Civil War photos books and framed Lincoln and Jefferson Davis funeral train schedules and the Shiloh Battlefield cyclorama "Panorama" painting. Brother Griggs informed the Camp that there were nine Civil War cycloramas painted and many were lost including the Shiloh Battlefield, which was lost in Chicago 110 years ago.
2. On March 21st, Thursday in Leslie a program on the "The Lansing to Jackson Interurban Train line" is scheduled at 7pm at the Grand River Community Church; please contact Bob for more information.

Communications

1. An e-mail was received from former Camp member Jim Neely requesting information on the GAR Buckle the Camp had for purchase years ago. Brother Maillard replied that they are available on the Ames website.

Old Business

1. The Mt. Evergreen Cemetery's wooden "Soldier's Cemetery Sign" replacement by a permanent marker proposal continues.
2. Brother Brad Funkhouser family members' membership applications: his Father- Robert and Brad's two sons- Nicholas & Michael were motion approved by Brother Charlie Waters with all paperwork and dues paid, seconded by Brother Chris Cox. The men are joining under their relative Jacob Krebs, 78th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and the initiation is planned for April, motion passed.
3. The Medal of Honor John Kelly stone is being worked by the Medal of Honor Society currently to finalize this effort to get the stone.

For the Good of the Order

1. Programs planned for the coming year:
   a. Department Representative Keith Harrison will review ceremonies & rituals, and proper uniform & accoutrements to assist our camp's participation in these programs, planned for April.
   b. Mr. Ron Jones will be bringing his 24th Michigan Infantry's relative's rifle and gear from his service in the "Iron Brigade".
   c. Mr. John McLaughlin will bring in the Surgical Kit his relative used in the Civil War.
   d. June 8, "Tecumseh Brookside Cemetery Tour" is scheduled for the year.

Brother Lewis informed the Camp that he found a new Civil War relative that served with the 88th Ohio which worked as the Provost Guard for the protection of the Capital of Columbus. Brother Lewis also has a new book "On Many a Bloody Field: four years in the Iron Brigade" for those that may be interested in reading it and discussion of forming new regiments and back filling depleted regiments was held and lastly Brother Lewis brought in numerous Civil War Times Magazines for meeting attendees to have.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:05pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for April 8, 2013, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Return to the top of the page.


.

.

Return to the top of the page.


.

.

Oh Captain my Captain
By Walt Whitman

Oh Captain my Captain

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

Return to the top of the page.



.

Upcoming Events


April: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday April 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Saturday April 13th; Springfield IL

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Adrian, Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, and Williamston. Please check back for dates.
Monday April 8th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Saturday April 13th; Springfield IL

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Adrian, Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, and Williamston. Please check back for dates.

May: 2013
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday May 4th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.


Monday May 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Date to be announced

Cleaning Veterans headstones
Mt. Evergreen Cemetery Jackson MI.


Monday May 27th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Saturday May 4th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.


Monday May 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Date to be announced

Cleaning Veterans headstones
Mt. Evergreen Cemetery Jackson MI.


Monday May 27th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Return to the top of the page.

CLICK HERE TO SEE BACK ISSUES



The Nation mourns its fallen leader.
Abraham Lincoln February 12, 1809 ~ April 15, 1865

Return to the top of the page.

Other Events in April

Troops of the 6th Massachusetts are attacked as they march through Baltimore April 19, 1861

Battle of Shiloh (Pittsburg Landing) April 6 & 7 1862.

Sinking of the Sultana April 27, 1865.
Return to the top of the page.


.

.

Return to Austin Blair home page.