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"It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives."


March, 2014


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In this issue

Commanders Column
Secretary's Report
25th G.A.R. Encampment
New Members
Amputations
Wounds
Tobacciana
A Civil War Poem
Upcoming events
Back Issues
A photo from the Civil War


Commanders Column


Brothers

The first thing I would like to do is welcome our new members Kim Horning, and Nathan Tingley. Welcome to our camp. We all look forward to seeing you at our events to help keep green the memory of the men who fought to preserve the Union 150 years ago.

A reminder to all that our next meeting will be our camps 100th anniversary celebration. Like the soldiers in Father Abraham's army we are going to keep it low key. There will be a cake and light refreshments and we would like to get a group photograph so please, if at all possible, plan to attend the meeting so we can get that done. Also, Brother Maillard stated that he should have the 100th anniversary badges at that meeting so you can pick yours up then. Not sure on the cost yet as we haven't gotten the prices of everything but rest assure, it will be worth it. Also, at that meeting we will have a guest speaker. Bill Anderson will be speaking on Civil War currency and commurse in Jackson during the war.

We also have a guest speaker scheduled for our May meeting so please plan on attending that too. Jim Jackson will be speaking on Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters.

Looks like the fun for the summer is just starting, as we have other event planned for May as well. The first is scheduled for the 17th and is the headstone dedication for Brother Cox's ancestors in Stockbridge. We also will be dedicating the new marker at the Soldiers Plot in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery and will be starting school programs. Please check back for dates of the other events.

Howard Lloyd
Camp Commander
Austin Blair Camp No. 7
Department of Michigan
S.U.V.C.W.
www.austinblair.com

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~ Wounded in the War ~

Wounds

It is pretty common knowledge that during the Civil War two soldiers died of disease for every one that died from wounds. By the standards of the 20th or the 21st centuries these numbers are staggering, but by 19th century standards these numbers are actually relatively low. The ratio of British soldiers who died of disease during the Napoleonic and Crimean Wars were 8 to 1 and 4 to 1 respectively. Just a dozen short years before the Civil War, in the Mexican War, American soldiers were dying at a rate of seven for every one that died on the field of battle.

In 1862, Surgeon-General Hammond appointed Jonathan K. Letterman as medical director of the Army of the Potomac. One of the major innovations he instituted was a trained ambulance corps. This became the model for the world and both Germany and France adopted this system in the Franco-Prussian War. The South had their "infirmary corps" but it was never used on the same scale as it was by the North. This was probably one of the reason that 18% of Confederates died from wounds as compared to 14% of Union soldiers. That works out to about 1 for every 5 in the South and 1 for every 7 in the North. Advances in medicine and the speed in which that treatment was given to wounded soldiers brought that number down to 1 death for every 50 wounded soldier in Korea and to 1 out of every 400 in Vietnam. A Civil War soldier was eight times as likely to die from a wound and ten times more likely to die from disease as a Doughboy was in WWI.

Mr Lincoln visits the Wounded Remembrance of Mary Blackmar

After one of the fearful onslaughts at Petersburg, the wounded came pouring into my tent, which was nearest to the firing line, so that a drummer-lad had named it 'The Half Way House'. One lad dropped from the wagon in which he was being transported, as they passed my tent. I ran and cried out to the driver. He coolly replied, 'He is dead, what does it matter!

I knelt by the boy's side and found a remote evidence of life, but hemorrhage was so profuse it seemed he could not survive. I called the attention of surgeons, but all said 'We must go on'. So with my knowledge that life was not extinct, and that he was so young and had the force of youth, (moreover the hardships of the Confederates had toughened him), I remained on the ground at his side not daring to leave him, but compelled to use my fingers as a tampon.

I remained with him twenty-four hours before I felt safe in having him carried to a ward. Cramped and exhausted from such a strain, in addition to weakness induced by loss of sleep through nights and days previous, I could hardly crawl into my tent. Being cold I heated a brick, put it in my cot and was soon so deeply sunk in oblivion, it seemed I would have remained so forever, but for my companions, Misses V. and M., who came in at midnight. Soon after they retired they discovered a dense smoke filling the tent and were aware of burning wool. They called me again and again, but getting no reply they jumped up and pulled me from the burning cot and finally roused me, so that I calmly dressed.

Morning found my limbs, from ankles to knees, one solid blister, but this I was at first too stupid to realize, or even the danger which I had escaped through my faithful friends. No one knew of the accident but ourselves, and I went about my work as usual. Nature alone was the healer.

One day I asked a poor exhausted soldier - so feeble from disease and exposure that he could only whisper - if there was anything he wished, and said that if so I would try to get it for him. With tears and sighs he replied, "0h, Miss, if you would only get me some fried bacon with molasses poured over it, I would get well!" It was a novel dish to me but was easily attained, and the man's appetite was so quickened by the relishable food that he began to recover forthwith. In later years I learned that very many looked upon it as a special delicacy.

I was finally placed in charge of the Confederate wards, and there saw that grandest of men, President Lincoln. This was after the last assault on Petersburg, and men horribly wounded and sick, from both armies, were rushed into our camp hospital at City Point. I was given especial care of the private Confederates, and my companion, that fine, grand woman, Miss Vance, took charge of the Confederate officers. I had only an orderly to assist me - a boy about sixteen, - and what with the cleaning and caring for each sick, torn body, our powers were strained to the utmost limit of endurance. Our patients' cots were so close together that we could just squeeze between, and our ward so long that it required from three to four tents.

General Grant was at City Point, and President Lincoln came down at this time (June 21, 1864), before our army marched into Richmond. One day both of them were coming slowly down my avenue. The orderly rushed in and cried out - 'President Lincoln's coming!' I was at the extreme end of the hospital tent, but, girl-like, started forward that I might see him. At that instant, oh, such a puny, helpless wail, as of sick and dying infants, issued from every throat: 'Oh, don't leave us, Miss! He is a beast! He will kill us!'

I replied: 'Oh, no! He is a grand good man!' Again and again came forth that puny wail, 'Don't leave us, Miss!' till I finally said, 'Well, I'll not leave you, don't fear!' but by that time I had got to the front of the tent and the orderly had pulled back a flap on my request so that I peered out. Within about fifteen or twenty feet were both men. General Grant with the inevitable cigar, and President Lincoln, so tall, so lank, giving evidence of much sorrow, looming over him. I heard General Grant say distinctly, 'These are the Confederate quarters'. President Lincoln immediately said, 'I wish to go in here alone!'

I drew myself up into the corner as close as possible, and he bent under the open flap and came in. He went at once to a bedside, and reverently leaned over almost double so low were the cots, and stroked the soldier's head, and with tears streaming down his face he said in a sort of sweet anguish, "Oh, my man, why did you do it?" The boy in gray said, or rather stammered weakly, almost in a whisper, 'I went because my State went'. On that ground floor, so quiet was the whole ward, a pin could almost have been heard to fall. President Lincoln went from one bedside to another and touched each forehead gently, and with tears streaming asked again the question, and again heard the same reply. When he finally passed out from those boys, some grey and grizzled, but many of them children, there came as from one voice, 'Oh, we didn't know he was such a good man! We thought he was a beast!'

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. ~ NEW MEMBERS ~


Nathan Tingley

Kim Horning
At our March meeting the Camp and Auxiliary inducted two new members.
Our new members are Brothers Nathan Tingley and Kim Horning.
Welcome to both, we look forward to sharing our meetings and events with you.

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Cigarette/Cigar Cards and Labels

After the Civil War many companies rushed to cash in on the cerlebity status of some of the major players. One of those was the tobacco industry. Below you will find photos of a couple of such items. If you click on the picture you will be taken to the WikipidiA page for that person.

Phillip Sheridan - USA

Nathan Bedford Forest - CSA

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Amputations

The Cost of War

The slow-moving Minie bullet used during the American Civil War caused catastophic injuries. The two minie bullets, for example, that struck John Bell Hood's leg at Chickamauga destroyed 5 inches of his upper thigh bone. This left surgeons no choice but to amputate shattered limbs. Hood's leg was removed only 4 and 1/2 inches away from his body. Hip amputations, like Hood's, had mortality rates of around 83%. The closer to the body the amputation was done, the more the increase in the wound being mortal. An upper arm amputation, as was done on Stonewall Jackson or General Oliver O. Howard (who lost his arm at Fair Oaks in 1862) had a mortality rate of about 24%.

Following is a description of a common battlefield amputation. Missing arms and legs were permanent, very visible reminders of the War. Amputees ranged from the highest ranking officers, like John B. Hood, Stonewall Jackson, and Oliver O. Howard, all the way down to the enlisted men, such as Corporal C.N. Lapham of the 1st Vermont Cavalry who lost both of his legs to a cannon ball. Hood, Jackson, Howard, and Lapham were certainly not alone in their loss, as 3 out of 4 wounds were to the extremities...in the Federal Army this led to 30,000 amputations.

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Secretary's Report
Ron Tyrl PPC

The March 10, 2014 meeting of the Austin Blair Camp No.7 Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was held at the Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

Members in attendance were Brothers: Chris Cox, Joe Davis, Bob Griggs, Kyle Hamann, Henry Hawker, Howard Lloyd, Mike Maillard, Ron Tyrl, and Charlie Waters Jr. New Members: Kim Horning and Nathan Tingley.

Commander Lloyd opened the meeting by requesting Guide Kyle Hamann to present Brothers Horning and Tingley for initiation.

Brother Horning's membership application was accepted last meeting and Secretary Tyrl read the membership application for Brother Nathan Tingley. Brother Tingley derives his membership from his 2x Great Grandfather Jacob Casad Tingley, who served in Company H, 24th Missouri Infantry Regiment from October 1, 1861 to October 7, 1864 completing his term of service. Brother Waters motioned to accept Brother Tingley's application seconded by Brother Griggs, motion passed.

After the initiations, with presenting each with his SUVCW Badge, Flag and Ritual Book, Commander Lloyd opened the meeting for business: The Secretary's report was motioned accepted as published in the Courier by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Cox, motion passed.

The Treasurer's Report was motioned accepted as presented, by Brother Griggs and seconded by Brother Davis, motion passed.

Treasurer Maillard reported that he has a schedule conflict for the Mt Evergreen "Soldier's Cemetery Sign dedication tentatively scheduled for Memorial Day; so a date will be reset when he's available since he was instrumental in getting this project done.
Brother Maillard also reported forty Camp 7, 100th anniversary badges were ordered and hopefully will be available for the April meeting.

Patriotic Instructor

Brother Joe Davis brought in additional books and materials and he asked all to keep circulating items for the camp member's use

Graves Registration

1. Medal of Honor John Kelly's stone progress is with the Veterans Administration reviewing the paperwork; hopefully to be completed soon but the dedication of the Medal of Honor stone will be pushed back.
2. Bother Waters III attended the Dept. meeting and there are over 60,000 names in the State's database and the new CD was given out at this Dept. meeting so our Camp has the latest copy.

Signals

1. Brother Griggs has updated the Home page with the Auxiliary information- President June Lloyd's picture, etc.
2. Brother Griggs encourages all to visit the face book page especially his updating "This Day in History".

Old Business

1. Brother Cox reviewed the "100 Year Camp Celebration" for the Camp's up-coming April 2014 anniversary: Cake, Refreshments and a group photograph is planned. An e-mail will be sent out to encourage as many of our Camp members to attend this special anniversary. A celebration dinner possibility at a restaurant was also discussed as a way to get together to celebrate this 100th anniversary.
2. Brother's Cox, May 17th & Van Hoof's, date TBD, Veteran Stone Dedications planned for 2014.
3. Brother Hawker, the Camp's Historian, brought in items to the meeting for review and these items were placed in the Camp's existing locker and Brother Maillard is looking into his State contacts to acquire an additional locker for the Camp's use at Post 29, he's awaiting word from the state epresentative. It was also suggested that since Consumers gave the Camp the $1,000 contribution for the Soldier's Plaque and Stone monument that Brother Maillard inquire through his contact with Consumers if they have a locker available.

New Business

1. Brother Griggs sent out the Traverse City Camp's invitation to their 100th Anniversary Party on March 29th.
2. Brother Maillard suggested that we inquire if the GAR Post 48 chairs at the Ella Sharp Museum could be transferred or loaned to the Eaton Rapid's GAR Museum; Brother Maillard and Tyrl agreed to look into this.
3. The Department Encampment reminder was announced for May 10th in Lansing at the Great Lakes Christian College, all reservations for rooms and dinner must be in by April 21st.

For the Good of the Order

Events up-coming for the coming year:

1. School programs should be coming soon as spring arrives for Northwest, Paragon, Parma and East Jackson Memorial; e-mails will be sent out on dates as they are scheduled.
2. April 14th meeting Mr. Bill Anderson speaking on Civil War currency.
3. May 12th Camp Meeting, Mr. Jim Jackson will be our guest speaker on Company K, First Michigan Sharpshooters.
4. May 17th Brother Cox's Stone dedication in Stockbridge, Michigan.

Commander Lloyd proceeded to close the meeting at 8:00pm and our next camp meeting is scheduled for Monday, April 14, 2014, to be held at Post 29 American Legion, Jackson, Michigan.

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"THE SHARED CANTEEN"
By Jeanne Losey
"Now gather ‘round here, children,
And let your Grandpas tell
The story of the day we met."
(The story both knew well.)

The battled ended for the day.
Both armies had moved on.
The wounded lay to wait for help.
(For some, all hope was gone.)

Frank lay for hours in agony,
His right arm blown away.
He moaned in pain, but "Water" was
The only word he's say.

His coat of blue was ragged now;
His throat was parched with thirst,
And then there came a pain-filled voice
He hadn't heard at first.

Just merely steps away from him,
A wounded soldier lay.
A minie ball had torn a leg
From this young man in gray.

But, hearing Frank, he softly said,
"Hey, Yank, my canteen's full.
If Y'all can reach it, I will share,
But Y'all will have to pull

Yourself a little nearer me
‘Cause I caint move a bit.
My leg is gone, but I believe
The bleedin's kinda quit."

But when Joe's daughter had grown up
====And grew to love Frank's son,
====The two men were so glad to hear
====Their families would be one.

But when Joe's daughter had grown up
----And grew to love Frank's son,
----The two men were so glad to hear
----Their families would be one.

----But when Joe's daughter had grown up
----And grew to love Frank's son,
----The two men were so glad to hear
----Their families would be one.

---=But when Joe's daughter had grown up
----And grew to love Frank's son,
----The two men were so glad to hear
----Their families would be one.

----But when Joe's daughter had grown up
----And grew to love Frank's son,
----The two men were so glad to hear
----Their families would be one.

----And grew to love Frank's son,
----The two men were so glad to hear
----Their families would be one.

----But when Joe's daughter had grown up
----And grew to love Frank's son,

----The two men were so glad to hear

----Their families would be one.

With Herculean effort, Frank
Moved slowly over there
Beside the Rebel stranger who
Could understand and care.

So, sip by sip the canteen forged
A friendship that, by dawn,
Was born of water and of blood,
And always would go on.

When litter bearers found the men,
Frank made them take Joe first
Although he still was wracked with pain,
He felt Joe's wounds were worst.

Frank kept that canteen, and one day,
He, once again, met Joe,
For, on that same recovery train
They both had changed to go.

They visited like long-lost friends
And made a solemn vow
That they would always keep in touch,
and meet again, somehow.

That old canteen still held a place
Of honor in the heart
Of both men, even after years
When they are far apart.

But when Joe's daughter had grown up
And grew to love Frank's son,
The two men were so glad to hear
Their families would be one.

Young Joey loved his Frances, too,
And soon the pair were wed.
"And that canteen's the reason why
You're here," both grandpas said.

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Upcoming Events



March: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Monday March 10th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).


Monday March 10th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Ladies Auxiliary Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. ( Visitors welcome).

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April: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday April 12th; Springfield IL

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Monday April 14th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
Guest speaker will be William Anderson talking about Civil War Commerce in Jackson County


Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, Parma Elementary and Williamston. Please check back for dates.
Monday April 14th; 7 p.m.

56th Annual Lincoln Tomb Ceremony Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Ceremony at 10 a.m., luncheon at noon, centeral time.


Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29, 3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. ( Visitors welcome).
Guest speaker will be William Anderson talking about Civil War Commerce in Jackson County


Saturday April 12th; Springfield IL

Dates have not been set but sometime during April, May, or June school programs will be persented at Jackson Northwest, Jackson Paragon Academy, Parma Elementary and Williamston. Please check back for dates.

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May: 2014
Austin Blair Camp No. 7Auxiliary
Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.

Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic Grosvenor house
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Friday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

Saturday May 10th; Lansing MI

Department Encampment: Presented by the DUVCW - Great Lakes Christian College
6211 West Willow Highway, Lansing, MI.
Hospitality room Friday night, main floor, commons/dining area Comfort Inn.


Monday May 12th; 7 p.m.

Austin Blair Camp Meeting. American Legion Post 29,
Guest Speaker will be Jim Jackson, talking about Company K., First Michigan Sharpshooters
3200 Lansing Ave. Jackson MI. (Visitors welcome).


Saturday May 17th; All Day

3rd annual Civil war days at the historic
211 Maumee St Jonesville, MI 49250


Saturday May 17th; 1 p.m.

Headstone dedications for Edson & Augustus Norton
Oaklawn Cemetery, Stockbridge, MI.
Rain day Sunday May 18th.


Memorial Day Weekend; May 23-25

Coldwater Civil War Days - Heritage Park, Coldwater, MI

Monday May 26th

Memorial Day - Observed.
9:30 am, - Jackson and Concord Parades starting at 10:00 am.

Thursday May 30th

Memorial Day - Traditional.

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Members of the 5th Michigan Cavalry.

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A souvenir of the 25th Encampment held in Detroit.


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